temere

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See also: temeré

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin timēre, present active infinitive of timeō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

temere

  1. to fear
  2. to beware

Conjugation[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Italic *temezi (in darkness, blindly), a fossilised locative form of Proto-Indo-European *témHos (darkness), from *temH- (dark). Cognates include Sanskrit तमस् (támas), Persian تم (tam), and Latin tenebrae (darkness).

Adverb[edit]

temerē (not comparable)

  1. by chance, by accident, at random
  2. without design, intent, or purpose
  3. casually, fortuitously, rashly, heedlessly, thoughtlessly, inconsiderately, indiscreetly, idly

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • temere in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • temere in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • temere” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • quite accidentally, fortuitously: temere et fortuito; forte (et) temere
    • without reflection; inconsiderately; rashly: nullo consilio, nulla ratione, temere
    • to act reasonably, judiciously: prudenter, considerate, consilio agere (opp. temere, nullo consilio, nulla ratione)
    • to have no principles: omnia temere agere, nullo iudicio uti

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

teme +‎ -re

Noun[edit]

temere f (plural temeri)

  1. fear
  2. faintheartedness

Synonyms[edit]