terp

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See also: TERP

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Shortening of interpreter.

Noun[edit]

terp ‎(plural terps)

  1. (military or Deaf, slang) An interpreter (translator).
    • 2003 November 27, Paul Watson, “Losing Its Few Good Men”, in the Los Angeles Times:
      But for troops in the new Afghan army, there is a particular irritant: Afghan interpreters working with U.S. soldiers — called terps by troops in the field — can earn more than an Afghan army officer.
  2. (computing, slang) An interpreter (program that parses and executes another program).
    • 2009, "Dannii", IF System Idea (on newsgroup rec.arts.int-fiction)
      As far as I know all the TADS terps are just ports of the original.

Etymology 2[edit]

Shortening of terpene.

Noun[edit]

terp ‎(plural terps)

  1. Any of various essential oils containing monoterpene alcohols which are added to a henna mix to darken the color.

Verb[edit]

terp ‎(third-person singular simple present terps, present participle terping, simple past and past participle terped)

  1. (transitive) To add such an essential oil to (a henna mix).

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

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Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from West Frisian.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

terp m ‎(plural terpen, diminutive terpje n)

  1. artificial mound or hillock used as shelter during high tide

Synonyms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


West Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *þurpą, *þrepą ‎(village, farmstead, troop), from Proto-Indo-European *trab-, *treb- ‎(dwelling, room). Cognate with North Frisian torp, terp ‎(village, fallow), Dutch dorp ‎(village), German Dorf ‎(hamlet, village, town), Danish torp ‎(village), Swedish torp ‎(farm, cottage, croft), Icelandic þorp ‎(village, farm), Latin trabs ‎(beam, rafter, roof), Lithuanian trōbà ‎(farmhouse), Welsh tref ‎(town), Albanian trevë ‎(country, region, village).

Noun[edit]

terp c ‎(plural terpen, diminutive terpke)

  1. artificial mound or hillock used as shelter during high tide
  2. (archaic) village; nowadays replaced by doarp, which is of Dutch origin