thud

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See also: Thud

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English thudden (to strike with a weapon), from Old English þyddan (to strike, press, thrust), from Proto-Germanic *þuddijaną, *þiudijaną (to strike, thrust), from Proto-Germanic *þūhaną, *þeuhaną (to press), from Proto-Indo-European *tūk- (to beat). Cognate with Old English þoddettan (to strike, push, batter), Old English þȳdan (to strike, stab, thrust, press), Old English þēowan (to press), Albanian thundër (a hoof, talon, a shaft", figuratively, "oppression, torment).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • IPA(key): /ˈθʌd/
  • Rhymes: -ʌd

Noun[edit]

thud (plural thuds)

  1. The sound of a dull impact.
    • 1898, J. Meade Falkner, chapter 3, in Moonfleet (fiction), London: Edward Arnold:
      These were but the thoughts of a second, but the voices were nearer, and I heard a dull thud far up the passage, and knew that a man had jumped down from the churchyard into the hole.
    • 2018 May 26, Daniel Taylor, “Liverpool go through after Mohamed Salah stops Manchester City fightback”, in w:The Guardian[2], London, OCLC 60623878, archived from the original on 27 May 2018:
      Ramos had locked Salah’s right arm and turned him, judo-style, as they lost balance going for the same ball. Television replays hardened the suspicion it was a calculated move on Ramos’s part and, when Salah landed with a hell of a thud, the damage was considerable.
  2. A hard, dull impact.
    • 1995 January 26, Mary Ann Swissler, “Fremont Man Recovering from Livermore Pass Attack”, in Bay Area Reporter[3], volume XXV, number 4, San Fransico, page 18:
      Sinclair told the B.A.R. [Bay Area Reporter] he felt the thud of the pistol on his left cheek about a 100 feet from his car, []
  3. (BDSM) A slower, dull impact with a wide surface area.
    • 1992, Jay J. Wiseman, SM 101: A Realistic Introduction[4], second edition, San Francisco: Greenery Press, published 1996, →ISBN, page 181:
      Pillowcase whippings offer the look and feel of a flagellatio scene’s atmosphere, mood, and psychology while involving only very mild amounts of pain. (A pillowcase is almost all “thud” and very little “sting” in the sensations it creates.)
    • 2013, Sophie Morgan, No Ordinary Love Story[5], London: Penguin Books, →ISBN, page 294:
      It still wasn’t what I’d call painful but as he swung his arm and the strands of the flogger hit me together it felt like a solid thud rather than a number of different tails stinging me.

Coordinate terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

thud (third-person singular simple present thuds, present participle thudding, simple past and past participle thudded)

  1. To make the sound of a dull impact.
    • 1849, George Frederick Ruxton, Life in the Far West (non-fiction), New York: Harper & Brothers, page 183:
      At the same instant two arrows thudded into the carcass of the deer over which he knelt, passing but a few inches from his head.
    • 1874, Mrs George Cupples, “Mrs Glen and the Aberfoyle Orphanage”, in The Poetical Remains of William Glen, Edinburgh: William Paterson, page 47:
      [] while the tears streamed from his eyes, and his tail waved and thudded in perfect time on the sanded floor. But for the said thudding of the tail, I would have stopped, fancying the poor animal's nerves had been set on edge.

Synonyms[edit]

  • (a dull sound, to make a dull sound): flump, plunk

Coordinate terms[edit]

Translations[edit]


Romani[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Sauraseni Prakrit 𑀤𑀼𑀤𑁆𑀥 (duddha),[1][2] from Sanskrit दुग्ध (dugdhá, milk),[1][2] from Proto-Indo-Aryan *dugdʰás, from Proto-Indo-Iranian *dʰugdʰás,[3] from Proto-Indo-European *dʰugʰ-tós,[3] from *dʰewgʰ- (to be productive). Compare Hindi दूध (dūdh, milk) and Punjabi ਦੁੱਧ (duddha, milk).

Noun[edit]

thud m (nominative plural thuda)

  1. milk

Descendants[edit]

  • Kalo Finnish Romani: thund

References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 Turner, Ralph Lilley (1969–1985), “dugdhá”, in A Comparative Dictionary of the Indo-Aryan Languages, London: Oxford University Press, page 366
  2. 2.0 2.1 Boretzky, Norbert; Igla, Birgit (1994), “thud”, in Wörterbuch Romani-Deutsch-Englisch für den südosteuropäischen Raum : mit einer Grammatik der Dialektvarianten [Romani-German-English dictionary for the Southern European region] (in German), Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag, →ISBN, page 289a
  3. 3.0 3.1 Goto, Toshifumi (2013) Old Indo-Aryan Morphology and its Indo-Iranian Background (Veroffentlichungen zur Iranistik; 60)‎[1], Vienna: Austrian Academy of Sciences Press, →ISBN, § 3.8.3. verbal adjectives, page 139

Further reading[edit]

  • Yaron Matras (2002), “Historical and linguistic origins”, in Romani: A Linguistic Introduction[6], Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, →ISBN, page 39
  • Marcel Courthiade (2009), “o thud, -es- m. -a, -en-”, in Melinda Rézműves, editor, Morri angluni rromane ćhibǎqi evroputni lavustik = Első rromani nyelvű európai szótáram : cigány, magyar, angol, francia, spanyol, német, ukrán, román, horvát, szlovák, görög [My First European-Romani Dictionary: Romani, Hungarian, English, French, Spanish, German, Ukrainian, Romanian, Croatian, Slovak, Greek] (in Hungarian; English), Budapest: Fővárosi Onkormányzat Cigány Ház--Romano Kher, →ISBN, page 364b
  • Yūsuke Sumi (2018), “thud, ~a”, in ニューエクスプレスプラス ロマ(ジプシー)語 [New Express Plus Romani (Gypsy)] (in Japanese), Tokyo: Hakusuisha, published 2021, →ISBN, OCLC 1267332830, page 156

Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

thud

  1. Aspirate mutation of tud.

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
tud dud nhud thud
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.