traduce

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin trādūcō (lead as a spectacle, dishonor), from trāns + dūcō (I lead).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /tɹəˈdjuːs/, /tɹəˈdʒuːs/
    • (file)
  • (US) IPA(key): /tɹəˈdus/, /tɹəˈdjus/
  • (Canada) IPA(key): /tɹəˈdus/

Verb[edit]

traduce (third-person singular simple present traduces, present participle traducing, simple past and past participle traduced)

  1. (transitive) To malign a person or entity by making malicious and false or defamatory statements.
    • c. 1599–1602, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Hamlet, Prince of Denmarke”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act 1, SCENE IV, (please specify the scene number in lowercase Roman numerals)]:
      This heavy-headed revel east and west
      Makes us traduced and tax'd of other nations:
    • 1793, Benjamin Franklin, The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin[1], §33:
      “I am earnestly desirous then, my dear Sir, that you should let the world into the traits of your genuine character, as civil broils may otherwise tend to disguise or traduce it.
  2. (archaic, transitive) To pass on (to one's children, future generations etc.); to transmit.
    • 1646, Sir Thomas Browne, Pseudodoxia Epidemica, X:
      However therefore this complexion was first acquired, it is evidently maintained by generation, and by the tincture of the skin as a spermatical part traduced from father unto son [...].
  3. (archaic, transitive) To pass into another form of expression; to rephrase, to translate.
    • 1865, "The Last of the Tercentenary", Temple Bar, vol. XIII, Mar 1865:
      From Davenant down to Dumas, from the Englishman who improved Macbaeth to the Frenchman who traduced into the French of Paris four acts of Hamlet, and added a new fifth act of his own, Shakespeare has been disturbed in a way he little thought of when he menacingly provided for the repose of his bones.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Corsican[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin traducere, from Proto-Italic *tranzdoukō. Cognates include Italian tradurre and French traduire.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /traˈdut͡ʃe/
  • Hyphenation: tra‧du‧ce

Verb[edit]

traduce

  1. (transitive) to translate

Conjugation[edit]

References[edit]


Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /traˈdu.t͡ʃe/
  • Rhymes: -utʃe
  • Hyphenation: tra‧dù‧ce

Verb[edit]

traduce

  1. third-person singular present indicative of tradurre

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

trādūce

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of trādūcō

Noun[edit]

trāduce

  1. ablative singular of trādux

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin trādūcō, French traduire.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

a traduce (third-person singular present traduce, past participle tradus3rd conj.

  1. to translate

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): (Spain) /tɾaˈduθe/, [t̪ɾaˈð̞u.θe]
  • IPA(key): (Latin America) /tɾaˈduse/, [t̪ɾaˈð̞u.se]

Verb[edit]

traduce

  1. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of traducir.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of traducir.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of traducir.