-ling

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
See also: ling and Ling

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English -ling, from Old English -ling, from Proto-Germanic *-lingaz, a nominal suffix, probably composed of Proto-Germanic *-ilaz (agent/instrumental suffix) + Proto-Germanic *-ingaz (patronymic suffix). Akin to Old High German -ling, Old Norse -lingr, Gothic -𐌻𐌹𐌲𐌲𐍃 (-liggs) (in 𐌲𐌰𐌳𐌹𐌻𐌹𐌲𐌲𐍃 (gadiliggs)). More at -le, -ing.

Suffix[edit]

-ling

  1. A diminutive modifier of nouns having either the physical sense of "a younger, smaller or inferior version of what is denoted by the original noun", or the derived sense indicating possession of or connection with a quality, which may having the sense of "a follower or resident of what is denoted by the stem form".
  2. (as an adverb) In the manner or direction indicated by the main stem (object.)

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Usage notes[edit]

Words ending in -ing derived from a root ending on -l or in a mute -le, such as dazzling, have usually only an accidental resemblance, though sometimes there is a connection, as in sidling, which comes both directly from Middle English in this form, and as conjugated from of the derived modern English verb sidle.

References[edit]

  • Webster's Seventh New Collegiate Dictionary, Springfield, Massachusetts, G.&C. Merriam Co., 1967

See also[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Result of wrong segmentation of nouns with an -ing suffix. See above (English).

Suffix[edit]

-ling m

  1. A suffix that describes a male person (or other creature) in terms of a place of origin or a quality, as defined by the root to which it is added.

Derived terms[edit]


German[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

See above (English).

Pronunciation[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-ling

  1. A diminutive modifier of nouns having the physical sense of a younger, smaller or inferior version of what is denoted by the original noun.
  2. Indicates possession of or connection with a quality or property, such as Schwächling from schwach (one who IS weak) or Frühling from früh (the season [Spring] which comes early).
  3. A diminutive modifier of nouns, meaning a follower or resident of what is denoted by the stem form.

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From alteration of suffixal use of Old English lang (long)

Suffix[edit]

-ling

  1. adverbial suffix denoting direction, state or position
    hinderling "backwards"

Etymology 2[edit]

Proto-Germanic *-lingaz

Suffix[edit]

-ling

  1. suffix used in forming personal nouns
    dēorling "favorite, darling"
    rǣpling "prisoner, captive, criminal"

Descendants[edit]