agave

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See also: Agave, agáve, and agavé
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

English[edit]

Agave attenuata is typical of large Agave species with candelabra-like inflorescences

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Ancient Greek Ἀγαυή (Agauḗ, Agave), from ἀγαυός (agauós, noble, illustrious).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /əˈɡɑːveɪ/, /əˈɡeɪviː/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪvi

Noun[edit]

agave (plural agaves)

  1. Any plant in the large, variable genus Agave: succulent plants, commonly armed with formidable prickles; they flower at maturity after several years, and generally die thereafter; large species, such as the maguey or century plant, (Agave americana), produce gigantic inflorescences. Several are of economic importance as sources of fibre such as sisal, and alcoholic beverages such as tequila.
    • 1893 Charles Richards Dodge, A Report on the Leaf Fibers of the United States. Pub: Govt. print. office Washington
      The work of cutting the leaves, even from these isolated plants, was in the nature of an ordeal. Every member of the party took a knife and attacked the thicket, no one escaping the experience of bleeding hands and arms and of more or less injured clothing. If there is any place where strong language is halfway excusable it is in a thicket of Agave decipiens.
    • 1998, Octavia E. Butler, Parable of the Talents, HEADLINE PUBLISHING GROUP (2019), pages 25–26:
      It was one of the large, vicious varieties of agave, each individual plant an upturned rosette of stiff, fibrous, fleshy leaves, some of them over a meter long on the big parent plants.
    Synonym: century plant

Usage notes[edit]

Commonly confused with the unrelated genus Aloe, even referred to as "American Aloe".

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From New Latin Agave, from Ancient Greek Ἀγαυή (Agauḗ), name of one of the daughters of Cadmus, from ἀγαυός (agauós, noble, illustrious).

Noun[edit]

agave c (singular definite agaven, plural indefinite agaver)

  1. agave

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From New Latin Agave, from Ancient Greek Ἀγαυή (Agauḗ), name of one of the daughters of Cadmus, from ἀγαυός (agauós, noble, illustrious).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

agave m (plural agaves)

  1. agave

Further reading[edit]

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From New Latin Agave, from Ancient Greek Ἀγαυή (Agauḗ), name of one of the daughters of Cadmus, from ἀγαυός (agauós, noble, illustrious).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

agave f (plural agavi)

  1. agave

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from New Latin Agave, from Ancient Greek Ἀγαυή (Agauḗ), name of one of the daughters of Cadmus, from ἀγαυός (agauós, noble, illustrious).

Noun[edit]

agave m (plural agaves)

  1. agave (plant of the genus Agave)

Spanish[edit]

Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from translingual Agave, from Ancient Greek Ἀγαυή (Agauḗ), name of one of the daughters of Cadmus, from ἀγαυός (agauós, noble, illustrious).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /aˈɡabe/ [aˈɣ̞a.β̞e]
  • Rhymes: -abe
  • Syllabification: a‧ga‧ve

Noun[edit]

agave m (plural agaves)

  1. agave
    Synonym: pita

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]