aloe

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See also: Aloe, áloe, aloé, aloè, aloë, and Aloë

English[edit]

Aloe striatula, an aloe (2)

Etymology[edit]

From Old English alwe (fragrant resin of an East Indian tree), from Latin aloē, from Ancient Greek ἀλόη (alóē), from Hebrew אֲהָלִים(ʾăhālîm), ultimately from a Dravidian language; reinforced in Middle English by Old French aloes.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

aloe (plural aloes)

  1. (in the plural) The resins of the tree Aquilaria malaccensis (syn. Aquilaria agallocha), known for their fragrant aroma, produced after infection by the fungus Phialophora parasitica.
  2. A plant of the genus Aloe.
    • 1912, Arthur Conan Doyle, The Lost World[1]:
      In mercy I put a bullet through his skull, and he fell sprawling among the aloes.
  3. A strong, bitter drink made from the juice of such plants, used as a purgative.

Usage notes[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Irish: aló
  • Samoan: aloe

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin aloe.

Noun[edit]

aloe m or f (invariable)

  1. aloe (plant)

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek ἀλόη (alóē, aloes)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

aloē f (genitive aloēs); first declension

  1. The aloe.
  2. The bitter juice produced by the aloe used as a perfume, in medicine and in embalming.
  3. (figuratively) Bitterness (in general).

Declension[edit]

First-declension noun (Greek-type).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative aloē aloae
Genitive aloēs aloārum
Dative aloae aloīs
Accusative aloēn aloās
Ablative aloē aloīs
Vocative aloē aloae

Descendants[edit]

Cyrillic: алоја
Latin: aloja

References[edit]

  • aloe in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • aloe in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • aloe in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)

Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French aloe.

Noun[edit]

aloe f (plural aloes)

  1. lark (bird)

References[edit]

  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l'ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (aloe)

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin alauda (lark).

Noun[edit]

aloe f (oblique plural aloes, nominative singular aloe, nominative plural aloes)

  1. lark (bird)

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l'ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (aloe)

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin aloe

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

aloe f (plural aloes)

  1. aloe (plant of the genus Aloe)

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French aloès and Latin aloē, from Ancient Greek ἀλόη (alóē).

Noun[edit]

aloe f (plural aloe)

  1. aloe
  2. a substance extracted from the aloe plant

Declension[edit]


Samoan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English aloe.

Noun[edit]

aloe

  1. aloe

Spanish[edit]

Noun[edit]

aloe m (plural aloes)

  1. Alternative form of áloe

Further reading[edit]


Yoruba[edit]

álóè

Etymology[edit]

English aloe

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

álóè

  1. aloe
    Synonym: ewé etí erin