constitute

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English constituten, from Latin cōnstitūtum, neuter of cōnstitūtus, past participle of Latin cōnstituō (to put in place, set up, establish).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈkɒnstɪtjuːt/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈkɑnstɪt(j)uːt/
  • (file)

Verb[edit]

constitute (third-person singular simple present constitutes, present participle constituting, simple past and past participle constituted)

  1. (transitive) To set up; to establish; to enact.
    • 1651, Jer[emy] Taylor, The Rule and Exercises of Holy Living. [], 2nd edition, London: [] Francis Ashe [], OCLC 1203220866:
      Laws appointed and constituted by lawful authority.
  2. (transitive) To make up; to compose; to form.
    • 1779–81, Samuel Johnson, "Abraham Cowley" in Lives of the Most Eminent English Poet
      Truth and reason constitute that intellectual gold that defies destruction.
  3. (transitive) To appoint, depute, or elect to an office; to make and empower.

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

constitute (plural constitutes)

  1. (obsolete) An established law.
    • 1569, Thomas Preston, Cambyses:
      A naughty man that will not obey the kings constitute.

References[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Latin[edit]

Noun[edit]

cōnstitūte

  1. vocative singular of cōnstitūtus

References[edit]


Scots[edit]

Verb[edit]

constitute (third-person singular simple present constitutes, present participle constitutein, simple past constitutet, past participle constitutet)

  1. To constitute.