constitution

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See also: Constitution

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English constitucioun, from Old French constitucion (French constitution), from Latin cōnstitūtiō, cōnstitūtiōnem.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

constitution (plural constitutions)

  1. The act, or process of setting something up, or establishing something; the composition or structure of such a thing; its makeup.
    • (Can we date this quote by Sir J. Herschel and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      the physical constitution of the sun
  2. (government) The formal or informal system of primary principles and laws that regulates a government or other institutions.
    • 1848, Thomas Babington Macaulay, chapter 10, in The History of England from the Accession of James II:
      Our constitution had begun to exist in times when statesmen were not much accustomed to frame exact definitions.
  3. (law) A legal document describing such a formal system.
  4. A person's physical makeup or temperament, especially in respect of robustness.
    He has a strong constitution, so he should make a quick recovery from the illness.
    • (Can we date this quote by Story and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      Our constitutions have never been enfeebled by the vices or luxuries of the old world.
    • (Can we date this quote by Clarendon and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      He defended himself with [] less passion than was expected from his constitution.
  5. (dated) The general health of a person.
    • 1766 May, “The Life of Mr. Barton Booth”, in The Gentleman's and London Magazine: Or Monthly Chronologer, page 281:
      But when once his constitution began to decline, he broke very fast, and being attacked bya complication of diseases, he at length gave way to fate, May 10, 1733.
    • 1792 July 18, “History of Nicholas Pedrosa”, in The Phoenix, volume 1, number 3, page 39:
      Don Manuel de Casafonda the governor, whose countenance bespoke a constitution far gone in a decliner had thrown himself on a sopha in the last state of despair and given way to an effusion of tears:
    • 1827 July, “On the Mal-organization of the Medical Profession, and of the Necessity of a Medical Reform”, in The Oriental Herald and Journal of General Literature, volume 14, number 43, page 79:
      The physician, to gratify the apothecary, himself obliged to order ten times more physic than the patient really wants, by which means he ruins his constitution, and too often his life; otherwise how is it posible an apothecarty's bill in a fever should amount to forty, or fifty, or more pounds?
    • 1838, George Godfrey Cunningham, Lives of Eminent and Illustrious Englishmen:
      In early life his health was infirm, and his education much interrupted in consequence; but by diligent study, as his constitution improved, he made up his lost ground, and became one of the most accomplished classical and general scholars of his time.

Synonyms[edit]

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Translations[edit]

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French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French constitucion, from Latin cōnstitūtiō, cōnstitūtiōnem. Morphologically, from constituer +‎ -tion.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

constitution f (plural constitutions)

  1. constitution

Further reading[edit]


Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cōnstitūtiō, cōnstitūtiōnem.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Noun[edit]

constitution f (plural constitutions)

  1. (Jersey) constitution