dadi

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Anguthimri[edit]

Adjective[edit]

dadi

  1. (Mpakwithi) fast

References[edit]

  • Terry Crowley, The Mpakwithi dialect of Anguthimri (1981), page 185

Ewe[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dadi (plural dadiwo)

  1. cat[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Fiagã, Kwasi (1976). Grammaire eʋe: Eʋegbe ŋutinunya. Lomé: Institut national de la recherche scientifique, p. 101.

Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈda.di/
  • Rhymes: -adi
  • Hyphenation: dà‧di

Noun[edit]

dadi m

  1. plural of dado

Anagrams[edit]


Javanese[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Javanese dadi.

Adjective[edit]

dadi (ngoko dadi, krama dados)

  1. ready
  2. finished

Adverb[edit]

dadi (ngoko dadi, krama dados)

  1. so, therefore

Verb[edit]

dadi (ngoko dadi, krama dados)

  1. to become
  2. to assume the role of

References[edit]

  • “[ dadi]” in Bausastra Jawa, Yogyakarta: The Linguistic Center of Yogyakarta [Balai Bahasa Provinsi Yogyakarta].

Maltese[edit]

Noun[edit]

dadi

  1. plural of dada

Maquiritari[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dadi

  1. the genip tree, Genipa americana or Genipa spruceana
    Synonym: tununu
  2. a transparent sticky oil or resin extracted from the genip tree, used as a black bodypaint when mixed with soot from the cassava grills (jütadi)
    Synonym: tununu

Usage notes[edit]

See the notes at tununu.

References[edit]

  • Cáceres, Natalia (2011), “dadi”, in Grammaire Fonctionnelle-Typologique du Ye’kwana, Lyon
  • de Civrieux, Marc (1980), “caruto (tununu)”, in  David M. Guss, transl., Watunna: An Orinoco Creation Cycle, San Francisco: North Point Press, →ISBN
  • Monterrey, Nalúa Rosa Silva (2012) Hombres de curiara y mujeres de conuco. Etnografía de los indigenas Ye’kwana de Venezuela, Ciudad Bolívar: Universidad Nacional Experimental de Guayana, page 40

Mauritian Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Hindi दादी (dādī).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dadi

  1. paternal grandmother

Old Javanese[edit]

Verb[edit]

dadi

  1. to become
  2. to be born

Ternate[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Javanese ꦢꦢꦶ (dadi).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

dadi (Jawi دادي‎)

  1. (intransitive) to happen, occur, come about
  2. (transitive) to become
    odadi kolanohe becomes the king
  3. (auxiliary) to be possible; to be able to, to be capable of
    una otagi dadi uahe cannot go
    una hoi ngara, odadi uahe cannot open the door
    mina mogolaha meja ge dadishe can make that table
    modadishe can

Usage notes[edit]

This auxiliary generally follows the main verb, thought it may rarely precede. It may take the subject clitics (o, mo, etc.) only either for emphasis or when dadi is used as the sole verb in a sentence.

Conjugation[edit]

Conjugation of dadi
Singular Plural
Inclusive Exclusive
1st todadi fodadi midadi
2nd nodadi nidadi
3rd Masculine odadi idadi, yodadi
Feminine modadi
Neuter idadi
- archaic

Adverb[edit]

dadi (Jawi دادي‎)

  1. therefore, thus
    dadi, ngofa ge opoha ri uatherefore, the child could not endure it any longer

References[edit]

  • Frederik Sigismund Alexander de Clercq (1890) Bijdragen tot de kennis der Residentie Ternate, E.J. Brill
  • Rika Hayami-Allen (2001) A descriptive study of the language of Ternate, the northern Moluccas, Indonesia, University of Pittsburgh

West Makian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Likely from Ternate dadi (to become), from Javanese ꦢꦢꦶ (dadi).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

dadi

  1. (transitive) to become
    nidadi puniyou became an evil spirit
    madadi sangajihe became a sangaji

Usage notes[edit]

The verb dadi ("to become") takes the same verbal prefixes that stative verbs do.

Conjugation[edit]

Conjugation of dadi (stative verb)
singular plural
inclusive exclusive
1st person tidadi midadi adadi
2nd person nidadi fidadi
3rd person inanimate idadi didadi
animate madadi
imperative —, dadi —, dadi

References[edit]

  • Clemens Voorhoeve (1982) The Makian languages and their neighbours[1], Pacific linguistics