emoji

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See also: Emoji

English[edit]

Four emojis: 🍇, 😂, 🙄, and 🐙

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Japanese 絵文字 (えもじ, emoji), from (, e, picture) + 文字 (もじ, moji, character). The apparent connection to emotion and emoticon is coincidental.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

emoji (plural emojis or emoji)

  1. A digital graphic icon with a unique code point used to represent a concept or object, originally used in Japanese text messaging but since adopted internationally in other contexts such as social media.
    Coordinate terms: emoticon, kaomoji, sticker
    • 2002, Language International: The Business Resource for a Multilingual Age, volume 14, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, ISSN 0923-182X, OCLC 632965387, page 45:
      In order to communicate quickly, many mobile phone users use emoji characters (similar to emoticons) while sending messages. Service providers have also created a set of emoji characters and have added support for it.
    • 2010 April 17, Martin Bryant, “Twitter Reveals Details of New ‘Annotated Tweets’ Feature”, in The Next Web[1], archived from the original on 22 February 2017:
      One of the most exciting announcements at Twitter's Chirp conference this week was "Annotated Tweets". [] The data attached doesn't have to be simple text. Twitter suggests examples such as MIDI data (for music) or emoji (for fancy emoticons).
    • 2011 April 5, Sam Biddle, “IRL Emojis: Our New Favourite Way to Waste Time on the Phone”, in Gizmodo[2], archived from the original on 20 March 2013:
      So what do a bunch of dudes with iPhones do when they haven't eaten all day, are waiting at your restaurant table, starving, annoyed, and need to pass the time. They innovate. They bring emojis to life. In public. [] Give it a shot – it's probably the one semi-practical thing you can do with an emoji [].
    • 2017, Marcel Danesi, “Emoji Grammar”, in The Semiotics of Emoji (Bloomsbury Advances in Semiotics), London; New York, N.Y.: Bloomsbury Academic, Bloomsbury Publishing, →ISBN, page 77:
      Like any natural language grammar, the distribution of emoji in texts, as well as the construction of phrases and sentences with emoji symbols in them, implies a systematic structure, otherwise it would be impossible to literally "read" the emoji texts.
    • 2017 August, Vyvyan Evans, “What’s in a Word?”, in The Emoji Code: The Linguistics behind Smiley Faces and Scaredy Cats, 1st US edition, New York, N.Y.: Picador, →ISBN, page 102:
      At present, Emoji functions not to replace the linguistic mode, but to complement it – the good old-fashioned English word is not going to be in danger any time soon. Emoji enables, arguably for the first time, a multimodal component to text-based digital communication, providing a code that fills out the communicative message in the linguistic mode, conveyed through text.
    • 2018 March 24, “Apple Wants to Introduce New Emojis for Disabled People”, in BBC News[3], archived from the original on 9 July 2018:
      Apple wants to introduce new emojis to better represent people with disabilities. A guide dog, a wheelchair user and prosthetic limbs are just some of the symbols it's suggested.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Finnish[edit]

Finnish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fi

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Japanese 絵文字 (えもじ, emoji), from (, e, picture) + 文字 (もじ, moji, character).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈemoji/, [ˈe̞mo̞ji]
  • Rhymes: -emoji
  • Syllabification: e‧mo‧ji

Noun[edit]

emoji

  1. emoji.

Declension[edit]

Inflection of emoji (Kotus type 6/paperi, no gradation)
nominative emoji emojit
genitive emojin emojien
emojeiden
emojeitten
partitive emojia emojeita
emojeja
illative emojiin emojeihin
singular plural
nominative emoji emojit
accusative nom. emoji emojit
gen. emojin
genitive emojin emojien
emojeiden
emojeitten
partitive emojia emojeita
emojeja
inessive emojissa emojeissa
elative emojista emojeista
illative emojiin emojeihin
adessive emojilla emojeilla
ablative emojilta emojeilta
allative emojille emojeille
essive emojina emojeina
translative emojiksi emojeiksi
instructive emojein
abessive emojitta emojeitta
comitative emojeineen
Possessive forms of emoji (type paperi)
possessor singular plural
1st person emojini emojimme
2nd person emojisi emojinne
3rd person emojinsa

French[edit]

French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Japanese 絵文字 (えもじ, emoji), from (, e, picture) + 文字 (もじ, moji, character).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

emoji m (plural emojis)

  1. emoji (digital graphic icon used to represent a concept or object).

Indonesian[edit]

Indonesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia id

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Japanese 絵文字 (えもじ, emoji), from (, e, picture) + 文字 (もじ, moji, character). The apparent connection to emotion and emoticon is coincidental.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /e.mo.d͡ʒi/
  • Hyphenation: é‧mo‧ji

Noun[edit]

emoji (plural, first-person possessive emojiku, second-person possessive emojimu, third-person possessive emojinya)

  1. A digital graphic icon with a unique code point used to represent a concept or object, originally used in Japanese text messaging but since adopted internationally in other contexts such as social media.

Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

emoji

  1. Rōmaji transcription of えもじ

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Japanese 絵文字 (えもじ, emoji), from (, e, picture) + 文字 (もじ, moji, character).

Pronunciation[edit]

Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es

Noun[edit]

emoji m (plural emojis)

  1. emoji (digital graphic icon used to represent a concept or object).

Swahili[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Japanese 絵文字 (えもじ, emoji), from (, e, picture) + 文字 (もじ, moji, character).

Noun[edit]

emoji (n class, plural emoji)

  1. emoji (digital graphic icon used to represent a concept or object).