eter

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: éter, èter, Éter, and Èter

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

root of eten 'to eat' + -er

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eːtər

Noun[edit]

eter m (plural eters, diminutive etertje n)

  1. eater

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse etari, equivalent to ete +‎ -er

Noun[edit]

eter m (definite singular eteren, indefinite plural etere, definite plural eterne)

  1. an eater

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin aether, from Ancient Greek αἰθήρ (aithḗr)

Noun[edit]

eter m (definite singular eteren, indefinite plural etere, definite plural eterne)

  1. ether (chemistry)
  2. ether (historical, in physics and philosophy)
  3. the airwaves

Etymology 3[edit]

Verb[edit]

eter

  1. present of ete

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn
Wikipedia-logo.png
 eterar on Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From Latin aether, from Ancient Greek αἰθήρ (aithḗr)

Noun[edit]

eter m (definite singular eteren, indefinite plural eterar, definite plural eterane)

  1. ether (chemistry)
  2. ether (historical, in physics and philosophy)
  3. the airwaves

References[edit]


Old Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *enter, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁enter (between). Cognate with Latin inter (between) and Sanskrit अन्तर् (antár, between, within, into)

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

eter

  1. between, among
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 7d10
      Do·adbadar sund trá causa pro qua scripta est æpistola .i. irbága ro·bátar leosom eter desciplu et debe; óentu immurgu eter a magistru. Mógi sidi uili do Día; acht do·rigénsat in descipuil dechor etarru et déu diib: is hed on ɔsecha-som hic.
      Here, then is shown the reason for which the epistle was written, i.e. they had had contentions and disagreements between the disciples; unity, however, among their masters. They are all servants to God; but the disciples had made a distinction between them and (made) gods of them; that is what he corrects here.

Inflection[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Irish: idir
  • Manx: eddyr
  • Scottish Gaelic: eadar

Further reading[edit]


Old Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse eitr, from Proto-Germanic *aitrą.

Noun[edit]

ēter n

  1. poison, venom
  2. pus

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia pl

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

eter m inan

  1. ether (any compound with to hydrocarbon groups bonded to an oxygen atom)
  2. (informal) diethyl ether

Declension[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French éther, Latin aethēr.

Noun[edit]

eter m (plural eteri)

  1. (organic chemistry) ether (compound containing an oxygen atom bonded to two hydrocarbon groups)
  2. (archaic, physics) ether (substance once thought to fill all space)

Declension[edit]

Noun[edit]

eter n (plural eteruri)

  1. (figuratively) air, sky, atmosphere
  2. (ancient philosophy and alchemy, uncountable) ether (classical physical element)

Declension[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

eter c

  1. ether (a chemical)
    Sedan Morton (1846) lärt känna eterns bedöfvande verkan --Nordisk familjebok (1917)
  2. ether (once thought a substance filling all space, carrying electromagnetic waves; or the sky in general)
    Cedern strävar stolt mot eterns dag. --poetry by Erik Johan Stagnelius (c. 1820)
    Eterns tillvaro har ännu ej kunnat direkt påvisas --Nordisk familjebok (1881)

Declension[edit]

Declension of eter 
Uncountable
Indefinite Definite
Nominative eter etern
Genitive eters eterns

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]