gab

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See also: GAB and gãb

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English gabben, from Old English gabban ‎(to scoff, mock, delude, jest) and Old Norse gabba ‎(to mock, make sport of); both from Proto-Germanic *gabbaną ‎(to mock, jest), from Proto-Indo-European *ghabh- ‎(to be split, be forked, gape). Cognate with Scots gab ‎(to mock, prate), North Frisian gabben ‎(to jest, sport), Middle Dutch gabben ‎(to mock), Middle Low German gabben ‎(to jest, have fun).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gab ‎(plural gabs)

  1. Idle chatter.
  2. The mouth or gob.
  3. One of the open-forked ends of rods controlling reversing in early steam engines.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

gab ‎(third-person singular simple present gabs, present participle gabbing, simple past and past participle gabbed)

  1. (intransitive, obsolete) To jest; to tell lies in jest; exaggerate; lie.
  2. (intransitive) To talk or chatter a lot, usually on trivial subjects.
  3. (transitive, obsolete) To speak or tell falsely.

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Amanab[edit]

Noun[edit]

gab

  1. a large dove

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse gap, verbal noun to gapa ‎(to gape).

Noun[edit]

gab n (singular definite gabet, plural indefinite gab)

  1. mouth, jaws
  2. yawn
  3. gap

Inflection[edit]


German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

gab

  1. First-person singular preterite of geben.
  2. Third-person singular preterite of geben.

Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Old Norse gabb.

Noun[edit]

gab m ‎(oblique plural gas, nominative singular gas, nominative plural gab)

  1. joke
    • circa 1177, Chrétien de Troyes, Le Chevalier de la Charrette, page 50 (of the Livres de Poche Lettres gothiques edition, ISBN 9782253054016), line 96:
      Est ce a certes ou a gas?
      Is this certain or in jest?

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]