herien

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Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English herian, from Proto-Germanic *hazjaną.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈhərjən/, /ˈhəriən/, /ˈhərən/, /ˈhɛːrən/

Verb[edit]

herien

  1. To thank or commend.
    • 14thC, Geoffrey Chaucer, The Clerk's Prologue and Tale, 2002, Marion Wynne-Davies (editor), The Tales of The Clerk and The Wife of Bath, page 94,
      And whan that folk it to his fader tolde, / Nat oonly he, but al his contree merye / Was for this child, and God they thanke and herye.
  2. To recognise, glorify, or laud
    • c. 1380s, Geoffrey Chaucer, Troilus and Criseyde, 1810, Samuel Johnson (editor), Alexander Chalmers (additional lives), The Works of the English Poets, from Chaucer to Cowper, Volume 1, page 251,
      How I mote tell anon right the gladnesse / Of Troilus, to Venus herying, / To the which who nede hath, God him bring.
    • 14thC, William de Shoreham, 1851, Early English Poetry, Ballads and Popular Literature of the Middle Ages, Volume 28, Percy Society, page 117,
      Thyse aungeles heryeth here wyth stevene, / Ase he hys hare quene of he[ve]ne.
  3. To rever, devote (oneself to).
Conjugation[edit]
Descendants[edit]
References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old English herġian, from Proto-Germanic *harjōną. Equivalent to here (army) +‎ -en.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈhɛrjən/, /ˈhɛriən/

Verb[edit]

herien

  1. To ruin, devastate, despoil, or loot
  2. To steal, snatch, or burglarise; to take without permission.
  3. To deliver people from burning in Hell.
  4. To bring, take, or draw.
  5. To defeat in battle; to attain or achieve victory.
  6. (rare) To run after; to pursue or hunt.
  7. (rare) To harass; harry, trouble.
  8. (rare) To fight, enter battle or combat.
Conjugation[edit]
Descendants[edit]
References[edit]