iho

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: ihō

Asi[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *qihu, from Proto-Austronesian *qiSu.

Noun[edit]

iho

  1. shark

Cebuano[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *qihu, from Proto-Austronesian *qiSu.

Noun[edit]

iho

  1. a shark; a scaleless, predatory fish of the superorder Selachimorpha, with a cartilaginous skeleton and 5 to 7 gill slits on each side of its head

Finnish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Finnic *iho, possibly from Proto-Uralic *jiša. Cognates include Erzya ёжо (jožo, surface).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈiho/, [ˈiɦo̞]
  • Rhymes: -iho
  • Syllabification(key): i‧ho

Noun[edit]

iho

  1. skin of a human being
  2. (anatomy) skin of a human being or an animal

Declension[edit]

Inflection of iho (Kotus type 1/valo, no gradation)
nominative iho ihot
genitive ihon ihojen
partitive ihoa ihoja
illative ihoon ihoihin
singular plural
nominative iho ihot
accusative nom. iho ihot
gen. ihon
genitive ihon ihojen
partitive ihoa ihoja
inessive ihossa ihoissa
elative ihosta ihoista
illative ihoon ihoihin
adessive iholla ihoilla
ablative iholta ihoilta
allative iholle ihoille
essive ihona ihoina
translative ihoksi ihoiksi
instructive ihoin
abessive ihotta ihoitta
comitative ihoineen
Possessive forms of iho (type valo)
possessor singular plural
1st person ihoni ihomme
2nd person ihosi ihonne
3rd person ihonsa

Derived terms[edit]

Compounds[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Hawaiian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Polynesian *iso, a variant of *uso, from Proto-Oceanic *uso (core of a fruit).

Noun[edit]

iho

  1. core, pith
  2. axis, axle

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Polynesian *hifo, from Proto-Oceanic *sipo (descend, go down).

Noun[edit]

iho

  1. descent

Particle[edit]

iho

  1. downward, below
  2. next, afterwards
    iho nei – recently, short time ago
  3. self, personally
Synonyms[edit]
Antonyms[edit]

Verb[edit]

iho

  1. (intransitive) to go down, descend

References[edit]

  • “iho” in the Hawaiian Dictionary, Revised and Enlarged Edition, University of Hawaii Press, 1986

Ilocano[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Spanish hijo (son), from Old Spanish fijo, from Latin filius.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: i‧ho
  • IPA(key): /ˈʔiho/, [ˈʔi.ho]

Noun[edit]

iho (feminine iha)

  1. son
  2. term of endearment for a boy by an older person
    Synonym: anak

Ingrian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Finnic *iho. Cognates include Finnish iho and Estonian ihu.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

iho

  1. skin of a human

Declension[edit]

Declension of iho (type 4/koivu, no gradation, gemination)
singular plural
nominative iho ihot
genitive ihon ihhoin, iholoin
partitive ihhoa ihoja, iholoja
illative ihhoo ihhoi, iholoihe
inessive ihos ihois, iholois
elative ihost ihoist, iholoist
allative iholle ihoille, iholoille
adessive ihol ihoil, iholoil
ablative iholt ihoilt, iholoilt
translative ihoks ihoiks, iholoiks
essive ihonna, ihhoon ihoinna, iholoinna, ihhoin, iholoin
exessive1) ihont ihoint, iholoint
1) obsolete
*) the accusative corresponds with either the genitive (sg) or nominative (pl)
**) the comitative is formed by adding the suffix -ka? or -kä? to the genitive.

References[edit]

  • Ruben E. Nirvi (1971) Inkeroismurteiden Sanakirja, Helsinki: Suomalais-Ugrilainen Seura, page 88

Tagalog[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Spanish hijo (son), from Old Spanish fijo, from Latin filius.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: i‧ho
  • IPA(key): /ˈʔiho/, [ˈʔɪ.ho]

Noun[edit]

iho (feminine iha)

  1. son
  2. term of endearment for a boy by an older person
    Synonym: anak

Derived terms[edit]


Võro[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Finnic *iho.

Noun[edit]

iho (genitive iho, partitive ihho)

  1. body

Declension[edit]


Votic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Finnic *iho.

Noun[edit]

iho (genitive ihoo, partitive [please provide])

  1. body
  2. skin

Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

References[edit]

  • V. Hallap, E. Adler, S. Grünberg, M. Leppik (2012) Vadja keele sõnaraamat [A dictionary of the Votic language]‎[1], 2 edition, Tallinn