ketchup

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See also: Ketchup and kétchup

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
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A bottle of tomato ketchup.
A bottle of mushroom ketchup.

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Uncertain, but probably ultimately from Chinese via Malay kicap, from Min Nan 膎汁 (kê-chiap, “fish broth”), though precise path is unclear – there are related words in various Chinese dialects, and it may have entered English directly from Chinese. Cognate to Indonesian kecap, ketjap (soy sauce). Various other theories exist – see Ketchup: Etymology for extended discussion.

First appeared in English in the late 17th century in reference to a Southeast Asian sauce encountered by British traders and sailors. The Oxford English Dictionary notes that it was commonly used in the 18th century to refer to a variety of similar sauces with varying ingredients—"anchovies, mushrooms, walnuts, and oysters being particularly popular"—but by the late 19th century the current tomato ketchup became the most popular form.[1]

Catsup (earlier catchup) is an alternative Anglicization, still in use in the U.S.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈkɛtʃ.əp/, /ˈkɛtʃ.ʌp/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Homophone: catch-up (one pronunciation)

Noun[edit]

ketchup (countable and uncountable, plural ketchups)

  1. (uncountable) A tomato-vinegar-based sauce, sometimes containing spices, onion or garlic, and (especially in the US) sweeteners.
  2. (countable, now rare) Such a sauce more generally (not necessarily based on tomatoes).
    • 1883, Cassell's Dictionary of Cookery (page lxxxiii)
      The bottles, however, were port bottles, but contained mushroom ketchup; []
    • 2003, Inns and Bed and Breakfasts in Quebec 2003 (‎Ulysses Travel Guides; page 46)
      To accompany meat, we prepare fruit ketchups and rhubarb chutney.

Usage notes[edit]

The spelling ketchup became significantly preferred in the United States due to the popularity of the Heinz brand, which shortly after its introduction in 1876 switched from catsup to this spelling to distinguish itself from competitors. Other major brands, such as Hunt, subsequently followed, with Del Monte only switching to ketchup in 1988.[2]

This condiment is more commonly and somewhat ambiguously called tomato sauce outside of the Americas. In South Africa, the word ketchup is not generally understood.

Descendants[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

ketchup (third-person singular simple present ketchups, present participle ketchupping, simple past and past participle ketchupped)

  1. (transitive) To cover with ketchup.
    • 1867, John Maddison Morton, Aunt Charlotte's maid: a farce in one act:
      It strikes me she's "ketchupped" the lot! I won't touch a morsel!
    • 1973, Horizon, page 15:
      "Well," said Chuck, ketchupping his hamburger, "I'd rather do without King Lear than put up with the human agony it sprang out of. I'd rather not have the Eroica than have the big bloody conqueror it tries to immortalize."
    • 2009, David Silverman, Twinkle, page 4:
      Their fellow diners, like their ketchupped grub, were appropriately dashed and splattered with paint and plaster, reading their Suns and Daily Mirror.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Ketchup", Oxford English Dictionary (online edition, 2020).
  2. ^ Is There a Difference Between Ketchup and Catsup?”, Slate, Aisha Harris, April 22, 2013

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English ketchup. Ultimately from Chinese. See English etymology.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ketchup c (singular definite ketchuppen, plural indefinite ketchupper)

  1. (uncountable) ketchup (a tomate sauce with vinegar)
  2. (countable) ketchup (a particular brand or type of ketchup)

Inflection[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English ketchup. Ultimately from Chinese. See English etymology.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ketchup m (plural ketchups, diminutive ketchupje n)

  1. ketchup

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English ketchup. Ultimately from Chinese. See English etymology.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ketchup m (plural ketchups)

  1. ketchup

Further reading[edit]


Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): //ˈkɛ.t͡ʂup// invalid IPA characters (//), (rare) //ˈkɛ.t͡ʂap// invalid IPA characters (//)

Noun[edit]

ketchup m inan

  1. Alternative spelling of keczup.

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • ketchup in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • ketchup in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese[edit]

Noun[edit]

ketchup m (plural ketchups)

  1. Alternative spelling of catchup

Quotations[edit]

For quotations using this term, see Citations:ketchup.


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Noun[edit]

ketchup m (Cyrillic spelling кетцхуп)

  1. Alternative form of kečap

Spanish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English ketchup. Ultimately from Chinese. See English etymology.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /keˈt͡ʃup/, [keˈt͡ʃup]

Noun[edit]

ketchup m (plural ketchups)

  1. ketchup

Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English ketchup

Noun[edit]

ketchup c

  1. ketchup

West Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English ketchup

Noun[edit]

ketchup c (no plural)

  1. ketchup