shire

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See also: Shire and -shire

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English shire, from Old English scir, from Proto-Germanic *skīrō, *skīzō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

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shire (plural shires)

  1. Physical area administered by a sheriff.
  2. Former administrative area of Britain; a county.
    Yorkshire is the largest shire in England.
  3. (Britain, colloquial) The general area in which a person lives, used in the context of travel within the UK.
    When are you coming back to the shire?
  4. A rural or outer suburban local government area of Australia.
  5. A shire horse.

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Verb[edit]

shire (third-person singular simple present shires, present participle shiring, simple past and past participle shired)

  1. To (re)constitute as one or more shires or counties.
    • 1985, Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy, page 291:
      Although he still managed formally to shire the province in the summer and autumn of 1585, his plan to establish a presidential government and complete the integration of Ulster into English Ireland met with royal indifference.
    • 2012, James Lydon, The Making of Ireland: From Ancient Times to the Present →ISBN, page 160:
      The province was shired into nine counties, []
    County Longford was shired in 1586

Anagrams[edit]


Dongxiang[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Mongolic *sirexe, compare Mongolian ширээ (širee).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ʂiˈrə/, [ʂɨˈrɛ]

Noun[edit]

shire

  1. table
    ijieku dunxila chukuide wo, yunjiku dunxila shire jiere wo.
    The food is in the cupboard and the things for use are on the table.

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English sċīr (shire).

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

shire (plural shires or shiren)

  1. shire, district, county
    • late 14th c. Geoffrey Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales. General Prologue: 15-16.
      And specially from every shires ende
      Of Engelond, to Caunterbury they wende,
      And specially from every shire's end
      Of England they to Canterbury went,
Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old English sċīr (bright).

Adjective[edit]

shire

  1. Alternative form of schyre (bright)

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old English sċīran.

Verb[edit]

shire

  1. Alternative form of schiren