swat

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Swat, SWAT, and S.W.A.T.

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (US) IPA(key): /swɒt/, /swŏt/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɒt

Etymology 1[edit]

Verb[edit]

swat (third-person singular simple present swats, present participle swatting, simple past and past participle swatted)

  1. (transitive) To beat off, as insects; to bat, strike, or hit.
    He swatted the mosquito that was buzzing around in his bedroom.
    The cat swatted at the feather.
    • 2017, Jennifer S. Holland, For These Monkeys, It’s a Fight for Survival., National Geographic (March 2017)[1]
      During my first day in the woods, Raoul, the big alpha male of Rambo II, opened wide to show me his dagger-sharp canines, then sauntered by and swatted my calf with a stick—letting me know my place in the social order. (Low.)
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

swat (plural swats)

  1. A hard stroke, hit or blow, e.g., as part of a spanking.
  2. Alternate spelling of swot: vigorous study at an educational institution.
    • 1844, Kaye, John William, chapter 3, in Peregrine Pultuney: or, Life in India[2], volume I, Adelaide Street, Trafalgar Square, London: John Mortimer, retrieved 2020-01-08, page 73:
      These seemed to be talking very vehemently about something they called " swat." One of these young gentlemen who had black hair and a pimpled face, seeing Peregrine, turned round and asked him "how far had he gone?" "Where" asked Peregrine, hastily. "In swat!" said the pimple-faced boy. "What's swat?" asked Peregrine Pultuney. "In your studies," said he of the pimples.
    • 1844, “Rules and Regulations of the Honorable East India Company's Seminary at Addiscombe, 1834”, in John William Kaye, editor, Calcutta Review[3], volume II, No. 4 Tank Square, Calcutta: Sanders and Cones, retrieved 2020-01-08, page 136:
      There is work enough—and too much—without this voluntary labor. The confinement during the bright sunny hours of the day is irksome and dispiriting; and it may be fairly questioned whether less would be learnt, if the study hours were reduced from nine to seven—especially as the greater part of these nine long hours is devoted to Mathematics. The cadets have a shorter word for it; they call it swat—a monosyllable which may puzzle the etimologists; but we believe it to be a corruption of the word sweat, and as signifying that a knowledge of mathematics is only to be acquired with much toil—with much sweat of the brow—a sufficiently expressive, word it must be acknowledged.
Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See SWAT.

Verb[edit]

swat (third-person singular simple present swats, present participle swatting, simple past and past participle swatted)

  1. (slang) To illegitimately provoke a SWAT assault upon (someone).
    • 2017, Elizabeth Heiter, Stalked, MIRA (→ISBN):
      “You've just been swatted.” “What?” Sophia asked. “A spoofed call to police, claiming an emergency, to get a SWAT response,” Evelyn said. Realizing why the SWAT officer had noticed the controller, she guessed, []

Anagrams[edit]


Louisiana Creole French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French soit (thus).

Conjunction[edit]

swat

  1. or

Maltese[edit]

Noun[edit]

swat

  1. plural of sawt

Old English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *swait-, from Proto-Indo-European *swoyd-, *sweyd-. Cognate with Old Saxon swêt, Old High German sweiz, Old Norse sveiti (sweat, blood). The Indo-European root also gave Latin sudor, Sanskrit Sanskrit स्वेद (sveda).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

swāt m or n

  1. sweat
  2. used of other moisture that comes from the body, especially blood

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • English: swate, swote, swot, swete, swet

Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *svatъ.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

swat m pers (feminine swatka)

  1. A matchmaker.
  2. The father of one's child-in-law.

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • swat in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • swat in Polish dictionaries at PWN