vacuum

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: vacuüm

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin vacuum (an empty space, void), noun use of neuter of vacuus (empty), related to vacare (be empty).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈvæ.kjuːm/, /ˈvæ.kjuː.əm/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

vacuum (plural vacuums or (rare, formal) vacua)

  1. A region of space that contains no matter.
    Synonyms: vacancy, void
    Antonym: plenum
    • 2008, BioWare, Mass Effect (Science Fiction), Redwood City: Electronic Arts, →ISBN, OCLC 246633669, PC, scene: Citadel Station: Wards Codex entry:
      The Wards are open-topped, with skyscrapers rising from the superstructure. Towers are sealed against vacuum, as the breathable atmosphere envelope is only maintained to a height of about seven meters. The atmosphere is contained by the centrifugal force of rotation and a "membrane" of dense, colorless sulphur hexafluoride gas, held in place by carefully managed mass effect fields.
  2. (colloquial, only pluralized as "vacuums") A vacuum cleaner.
    Synonym: (British) hoover
  3. The condition of rarefaction, or reduction of pressure below that of the atmosphere, in a vessel, such as the condenser of a steam engine, which is nearly exhausted of air or steam, etc.
    a vacuum of 26 inches of mercury, or 13 pounds per square inch
  4. (physics) A spacetime having tensors of zero magnitude.
  5. An emptiness in life created by a loss of a person who was close, or of an occupation.
    • 1837, Letitia Elizabeth Landon, Ethel Churchill, volume 3, pages 82-83:
      Henrietta soon found a terrible vacuum left, by the letters in which she used to pour forth every feeling and thought to her uncle.

Usage notes[edit]

  • The Latin in vacuo is sometimes used instead of in a vacuum (in free space).

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb[edit]

vacuum (third-person singular simple present vacuums, present participle vacuuming, simple past and past participle vacuumed)

  1. (transitive) To clean (something) with a vacuum cleaner.
    Synonym: (British) hoover
    • 2016, Janice M. Whiteaker, Run:
      “Who in the world cleans an attic? That's like vacuuming a shed.”
  2. (intransitive) To use a vacuum cleaner.
    Synonyms: (British) to do the hoovering, (British) to hoover
  3. (transitive, databases) To optimise a database or database table by physically removing deleted tuples.

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

vacuum m (plural vacuums)

  1. vacuum (space containing no matter)
    Synonym: vide

Descendants[edit]

  • Turkish: vakum

Further reading[edit]


Latin[edit]

Adjective[edit]

vacuum

  1. accusative neuter singular of vacuus

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin vacuum

Noun[edit]

vacuum n (plural vacuumuri)

  1. vacuum

Declension[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

vacuum m (plural vacuums)

  1. vacuum