weven

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Dutch[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch wēven, from Old Dutch *wevan, from Proto-Germanic *webaną, from Proto-Indo-European *webʰ-.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈʋeː.və(n)/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: we‧ven

Verb[edit]

weven

  1. (transitive, intransitive) to weave

Inflection[edit]

Inflection of weven (weak with strong past participle)
infinitive weven
past singular weefde
past participle geweven
infinitive weven
gerund weven n
verbal noun
present tense past tense
1st person singular weef weefde
2nd person sing. (jij) weeft weefde
2nd person sing. (u) weeft weefde
2nd person sing. (gij) weeft weefde
3rd person singular weeft weefde
plural weven weefden
subjunctive sing.1 weve weefde
subjunctive plur.1 weven weefden
imperative sing. weef
imperative plur.1 weeft
participles wevend geweven
1) Archaic.

Derived terms[edit]


Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch *wevan, from Proto-Germanic *webaną, from Proto-Indo-European *webʰ-.

Verb[edit]

wēven

  1. to weave

Inflection[edit]

This verb needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • weven (II)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • weven (I)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, 1929

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English wefan, from Proto-Germanic *webaną. The past forms are sometimes influenced by Old Norse vefa.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

weven

  1. To weave; to perform or do some weaving.
  2. To manufacture or craft textiles by weaving.
  3. To create a cobweb or spiderweb.
  4. To cross together sticks as to form a structure.
  5. To ornament or embellish via sewing or needlework.
  6. To research in order to create a document or speech.
  7. To affect or leave a lasting mark upon a person or thing.
  8. (rare) To embroil in conflict or distress; to afflict.
Usage notes[edit]

This verb sometimes appears as a weak verb, but this is uncommon and late.

Conjugation[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Probably from Old Norse veifa.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

weven

  1. To weave about; to move, especially erratically.
  2. To wound or strike mightily or with power, especially in a way causing decapitation.
  3. To act in a way resulting in one moving away; to disrupt something's position.
  4. To surrender; to acknowledge defeat or renounce conflict.
  5. (rare) To renounce or forego an action.
  6. (rare) To indicate or wave towards.
  7. (rare) To cause agony, anguish or mental trouble.
Conjugation[edit]
Descendants[edit]
References[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old English wǣfan.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

weven

  1. To enclose; to surround with material.
Conjugation[edit]
References[edit]