mel

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See also: Mel, mél, měl, and mêl

English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Latin mel (honey).

Noun[edit]

mel (uncountable)

  1. honey

Anagrams[edit]


Albanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin milium.

Noun[edit]

mel m (definite singular meli)

  1. millet

Breton[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mel m

  1. honey

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin mel (honey). Compare French miel, Italian miele, Portuguese mel, Romanian miere, Spanish miel.

Noun[edit]

mel f (plural mels)

  1. honey

Cornish[edit]

Noun[edit]

mel m

  1. honey

Dalmatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin mīlle.

Numeral[edit]

mel

  1. thousand

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse mjǫl, from Proto-Indo-European *melh₂- (to grind, rub, break up).

Noun[edit]

mel n (singular definite melet, not used in plural form)

  1. flour

Dhuwal[edit]

Noun[edit]

mel

  1. eye

Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin mel, mellis.

Noun[edit]

mel m (plural meles)

  1. honey

Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

mēl

  1. Romanization of 𐌼𐌴𐌻

Istriot[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin mel, mellis.

Noun[edit]

mel

  1. honey

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *mélid. Cognates include Ancient Greek μέλι (méli), Gothic 𐌼𐌹𐌻𐌹𐌸 (miliþ), and Old Armenian մեղր (mełr).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mel n (genitive mellis); third declension

  1. honey
  2. (figuratively) sweetness, pleasantness
    • c. 95 CE, Quintilian, Institutio Oratoria 3.1.5
      Sed nos veremur ne parum hic liber mellis et absinthii multum habere videatur
      But I fear that this book will have too little sweetness and too much wormwood.
  3. (figuratively, term of endearment) darling, sweet, honey
    • c. 254 BCE – 184 BCE, Plautus, Bacchides 18
      cor meum spes mea / mel meum suavitudo cibus gaudium
      My heart, my hope, my honey, sweetness, food delight.

Inflection[edit]

Third declension neuter i-stem.

Number Singular Plural
nominative mel mella
genitive mellis mellium
mellum
dative mellī mellibus
accusative mel mella
ablative melle mellibus
vocative mel mella
  • Note that the ablative singular melle has the alternative form melli.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • mel in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879

Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

mel

  1. rafsi of melbi.

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

mel n

  1. flour

Derived terms[edit]


Old Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin mel (honey), from Proto-Indo-European *mélid (honey).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mel m

  1. honey

Descendants[edit]

  • Galician: mel
  • Portuguese: mel

Portuguese[edit]

Wikipedia-logo.png
 Mel on Portuguese Wikipedia

Wikipedia pt

mel

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese mel (honey), from Latin mel (honey), from Proto-Indo-European *mélid (honey). Compare Catalan mel, French miel, Italian miele, Romanian miere, Spanish miel.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mel m (plural meles or méis)

  1. honey

Romansch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin mel, from Proto-Indo-European *mélid.

Noun[edit]

mel m (plural mels)

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun) honey
  2. (Rumantsch Grischun) jam

Synonyms[edit]


Volapük[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from French mer (sea), with the 'r' turned into 'l'.

Noun[edit]

mel (plural mels)

  1. sea

Declension[edit]