tog

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See also: tóg

English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin toga, "cloak" or "mantle". It started being used by thieves and vagabonds with the noun togman, which was an old slang word for "cloak". By the 1700s the noun "tog" was used as a short form for "togman", and it was being used for "coat", and before 1800 the word started to mean "clothing". The verb "tog" came out after a short period of time and became a popular word which meant to dress up.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tog (plural togs)

  1. A cloak.
  2. Clothes.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 7, Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      “[…] if you call my duds a ‘livery’ again there'll be trouble. It's bad enough to go around togged out like a life saver on a drill day, but I can stand that 'cause I'm paid for it. What I won't stand is to have them togs called a livery. […]”
  3. A unit of thermal resistance, being ten times the temperature difference (in °C) between the two surfaces of a material when the flow of heat is equal to one watt per square metre
Derived terms[edit]
  • megatog (rare, humorously hyperbolic)

Verb[edit]

tog (third-person singular simple present togs, present participle togging, simple past and past participle togged)

  1. (transitive) To dress.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 7, Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      “[…] if you call my duds a ‘livery’ again there'll be trouble. It's bad enough to go around togged out like a life saver on a drill day, but I can stand that 'cause I'm paid for it. […]”

Etymology 2[edit]

Abbreviation[edit]

tog

  1. (knitting) together
    • 2012, Kay Meadors, Knitting for a Cure (page 34)
      Row 1 (Right side): Slip 1, K1, K2 tog, YO, K 10, (K2 tog, YO) twice, K3.

Anagrams[edit]


Albanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Albanian *tāga, from Proto-Indo-European *(s)teg 'to cover'. Compare Greek τέγη (tégi, roof), Irish tech (house), Scottish Gaelic taigh (house), Lithuanian stiégti (to thatch a roof)[1].

Noun[edit]

tog f (indefinite plural togje, definite singular togu, definite plural togjet)

  1. heap, pile

References[edit]

  1. ^ A Concise Historical Grammar of the Albanian Language, V.Orel, Koninklijke Brill ,Leiden 2000, p.458

Danish[edit]

Danish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia da

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Low German toge, toch, from Old Saxon *tugi, from Proto-Germanic *tugiz. Cognate with Dutch teug, German Zug, Old English tyge. The sense "train" is derived from German Zug.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /tɔːɡ/, [tˢɔwˀ]

Noun[edit]

tog n (singular definite toget, plural indefinite tog or toge)

  1. train
  2. expedition
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See tage (to take).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /toː/, [tˢoːˀ]

Verb[edit]

tog

  1. past tense of tage

Dutch[edit]

Adverb[edit]

tog

  1. Misspelling of toch.
    Hij kwam tog? - He came, didn't he?

Faroese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tog n (genitive singular togs, plural tog)

  1. (hemp) rope
  2. long hair of a sheep skin

Declension[edit]

n4 Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative tog togið tog togini
Accusative tog togið tog togini
Dative tog(i) tognum togum togunum
Genitive togs togsins toga toganna

Icelandic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tog n (genitive singular togs, nominative plural tog)

  1. the act of pulling
  2. rope

Declension[edit]


Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

tog

  1. rafsi of tonga.

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

From German Zug

Noun[edit]

tog n (definite singular toget, indefinite plural tog, definite plural toga or togene)

  1. a train (line of connected cars or carriages, often hauled by a locomotive)

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From German Zug

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nn

Noun[edit]

tog n (definite singular toget, indefinite plural tog, definite plural toga)

  1. a train (as above)

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse tog.

Alternative forms[edit]

  • tau (also Norwegian Bokmål)

Noun[edit]

tog n (definite singular toget, indefinite plural tog, definite plural toga)

  1. a rope
    Kutt toget!
    Cut the rope!

References[edit]


Old Irish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

tog

  1. second-person singular imperative of do·goa

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
tog thog tog
pronounced with /d(ʲ)-/
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Verb[edit]

tog (verbal noun togail)

  1. build, erect
  2. lift, haul, pick up, hoist
  3. rear, bring up, raise (a child)
  4. rouse, stir

Derived terms[edit]


Slovene[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *tǫgъ. Cognate with Czech tuhý

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

tóg (comparative bòlj tóg, superlative nàjbolj tóg)

  1. rigid, stiff

Declension[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

tog

  1. past tense of ta.
  2. past tense of taga.