brew

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Middle English brewen, from Old English brēowan, from Proto-Germanic *brewwaną, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰreuh₁-, *bʰreh₁u- (compare Welsh berw (boiling), Latin fervēre, Albanian mbruaj (to knead), Russian бруя (brujá, current), Sanskrit भुर्वन् (bhurván, motion of water)).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

brew (third-person singular simple present brews, present participle brewing, simple past and past participle brewed)

  1. (transitive) To prepare (usually a beverage) by steeping and mingling; to concoct.
  2. (transitive) To foment or prepare, as by brewing; to contrive; to plot; to hatch.
    • John Milton
      Hence with thy brewed enchantments, foul deceiver!
  3. (intransitive) To attend to the business, or go through the processes, of brewing or making beer.
  4. (intransitive) To be in a state of preparation; to be mixing, forming, or gathering.
    • William Shakespeare
      There is some ill a-brewing towards my rest.
    • 2011 January 11, Jonathan Stevenson, “West Ham 2 - 1 Birmingham”, BBC:
      Grant may have considered that only a performance of the very highest quality could keep him in a job - and the way his players started the game gave the 55-year-old shelter from the storm that was brewing.
  5. (transitive, obsolete) To boil or seethe; to cook.

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

brew (plural brews)

  1. The mixture formed by brewing; that which is brewed; a brewage.
  2. (slang) A beer.
  3. (UK, New Zealand) A cup of tea.
  4. (UK, New Zealand) The act of making a cup of tea.
  5. (UK, informal) A hill.

Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *bry, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃bʰruHs

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

brew f

  1. eyebrow

Declension[edit]