plot

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See also: płot

English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English plot, plotte, from Old English plot (a plot of ground), from Proto-Germanic *plataz, *platjaz (a patch), of uncertain origin. Cognate with Middle Low German plet (patch, strip of cloth, rags), German Bletz (rags, bits, strip of land), Gothic [script needed] (plats, a patch, rags). See also plat. See also complot for an influence on or source of the "secret plan" sense.

Noun[edit]

plot (plural plots)

  1. The course of a story, comprising a series of incidents which are gradually unfolded, sometimes by unexpected means.
    • Alexander Pope
      If the plot or intrigue must be natural, and such as springs from the subject, then the winding up of the plot must be a probable consequence of all that went before.
  2. An area or land used for building on or planting on.
  3. A graph or diagram drawn by hand or produced by a mechanical or electronic device.
  4. A secret plan to achieve an end, the end or means usually being illegal or otherwise questionable.
    The plot would have enabled them to get a majority on the board.
    The assassination of Lincoln was part of a larger plot.
    • Shakespeare
      I have overheard a plot of death.
    • Addison
      O, think what anxious moments pass between / The birth of plots and their last fatal periods!
  5. Contrivance; deep reach thought; ability to plot or intrigue.
    • Denham
      a man of much plot
  6. Participation in any stratagem or conspiracy.
    • Milton
      And when Christ saith, Who marries the divorced commits adultery, it is to be understood, if he had any plot in the divorce.
  7. A plan; a purpose.
    • Jeremy Taylor
      no other plot in their religion but serve God and save their souls

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Verb[edit]

plot (third-person singular simple present plots, present participle plotting, simple past and past participle plotted)

  1. (transitive) To conceive (a crime, etc).
    They had plotted a robbery.
  2. (transitive) To trace out (a graph or diagram).
    They plotted the number of edits per day.
  3. (transitive) To mark (a point on a graph, chart, etc).
    Every five minutes they plotted their position.
    • Carew
      This treatise plotteth down Cornwall as it now standeth.
  4. (intransitive) To conceive a crime, misdeed, etc.
    They were plotting against the king.

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Albanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From plotë.

Adverb[edit]

plot

  1. full, fully

Czech[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *plotъ

Noun[edit]

plot m

  1. fence

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Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

plot

  1. first-, second- and third-person singular present indicative of plotten
  2. imperative of plotten

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *plotъ

Noun[edit]

plot m (Cyrillic spelling плот)

  1. fence

Declension[edit]