soar

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English[edit]

A hawk soars.

Etymology[edit]

From Old French essorer (to fly up, soar), from Vulgar Latin *exaurare (to rise into the air), from Latin ex (out) + aura (the air, a breeze), from Ancient Greek αὔρα (aúra, breath). Compare aura, and exhale.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

soar (third-person singular simple present soars, present participle soaring, simple past and past participle soared)

  1. to fly aloft with little effort, as a bird.
    When soars Gaul's vulture with his wings unfurled. Byron.
  2. to mount upward on wings, or as on wings.
  3. to fly by means of a glider or other unpowered aircraft.
  4. to rise, especially rapidly or unusually high.
    The pump prices soared into new heights as the strike continued.
  5. (figuratively) To rise in thought, spirits, or imagination; to be exalted in mood.
    Where the deep transported mind may soar. John Milton.
    Valor soars above What the world calls misfortune. Joseph Addison

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

soar (plural soars)

  1. The act of soaring.
    This apparent soar of the hooded falcon. Samuel Taylor Coleridge.
  2. An upward flight.

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin sonāre, present active infinitive of sonō.

Verb[edit]

soar (first-person singular present soo, first-person singular preterite soei, past participle soado)

  1. make a sound
Conjugation[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin solum

Noun[edit]

soar f (plural soares)

  1. building land

Manx[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Noun[edit]

soar m

  1. smell

Verb[edit]

soar (verbal noun soaral or soarey or soaraghey)

  1. to smell

Mutation[edit]

Manx mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
soar hoar
after "yn", toar
unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese sõar, from Latin sonāre, present active infinitive of sonō, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *swen- (to sound, resound).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

soar (first-person singular present indicative soo, past participle soado)

  1. make a sound
    • 1913, Fernando Pessoa, “Ó sino da minha aldeia”:
      Ó sino da minha aldeia, / Dolente na tarde calma, / Cada tua badalada / Soa dentro da minha alma.
      Oh bell of my village, / Lazy in this peaceful afternoon, / Each one of your tollings / Resounds in my soul.

Conjugation[edit]


Volapük[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from French soir (evening).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

soar (plural soars)

  1. evening

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]