एक

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Hindi[edit]

Hindi numbers
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    Cardinal : एक ‎(ek)
    Ordinal : पहला ‎(pahlā)

Etymology[edit]

From Sanskrit एक ‎(éka) (or a closely related Old-Indo-Aryan language, through Prakrit), from Proto-Indo-Aryan *aika-, from Proto-Indo-Iranian *ayka-.

Numeral[edit]

एक ‎(ek), Urdu spelling: ایک

  1. (cardinal) one; 1

Adjective[edit]

एक ‎(ek) ‎(Urdu spelling ایک)

  1. one, a / an
  2. sole, only

Nepali[edit]

Numeral[edit]

एक ‎(eka), pronounced एक् (ek)

  1. (cardinal) one

Old Hindi[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Sauraseni Prakrit [script needed] ‎(ekka), [script needed] ‎(ika), from Sanskrit एक ‎(eka).

Numeral[edit]

एक ‎(eka)

  1. one
    • c. 1500, Kabir, Assorted poetry, pad 77, line 1:
      एक जोति तैं सब उतपंना, कौंण वारंण कौंण सूदा
      eka joti taiṃ saba utapaṃnā, kauṃṇa vāraṃṇa kauṃṇa sūdā
      All have arisen from one light, who is a brāhmin and who is a śūdra?

Descendants[edit]


Pali[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Numeral[edit]

एक

  1. Devanagari script form of eka

Sanskrit[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-Iranian *Haykas, from Proto-Indo-European *(H)óykos ‎(one, single). Cognates include Old Latin oinos (Classical Latin ūnus), Ancient Greek οἶος ‎(oîos) and Old English ān (English one and an). (Can this(+) etymology be sourced?)

Numeral[edit]

एक ‎(éka)

  1. one

Adjective[edit]

एक ‎(éka)

  1. (with and without एव ‎(eva)) alone, solitary, single, happening only once, that one only
  2. the same, one and the same, identical
  3. one of two or many
  4. single of its kind, unique, singular, chief, pre-eminent, excellent
  5. sincere, truthful
  6. little, small
  7. (sometimes used as an indefinite article), a, an

Noun[edit]

एक ‎(ékam

  1. name of a teacher
  2. name of a son of रय ‎(Raya)

Noun[edit]

एक ‎(ékan

  1. unity, a unit (at the end of a compound)

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • Sir Monier Monier-Williams (1898) A Sanskrit-English dictionary etymologically and philologically arranged with special reference to cognate Indo-European languages, Oxford: Clarendon Press, page 0227