एक

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

Hindi[edit]

Hindi numbers
10
 <  0
1
2  > 
    Cardinal : एक(ek)
    Ordinal : पहला(pahlā)

Etymology[edit]

From Sanskrit एक(éka) (or a closely related Old-Indo-Aryan language, through Prakrit), from Proto-Indo-Aryan *aika-, from Proto-Indo-Iranian *ayka-.

Numeral[edit]

एक ‎(ek), Urdu spelling: ایک

  1. (cardinal) one; 1

Adjective[edit]

एक ‎(ek) ‎(Urdu spelling ایک)

  1. one, a / an
  2. sole, only

Nepali[edit]

Numeral[edit]

एक ‎(eka), pronounced एक् (ek)

  1. (cardinal) one

Old Hindi[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Sauraseni Prakrit [script needed](ekka), [script needed](ika), from Sanskrit एक(eka).

Numeral[edit]

एक ‎(eka)

  1. one
    • c. 1500, Kabir, Assorted poetry, pad 77, line 1:
      एक जोति तैं सब उतपंना, कौंण वारंण कौंण सूदा
      eka joti taiṃ saba utapaṃnā, kauṃṇa vāraṃṇa kauṃṇa sūdā
      All have arisen from one light, who is a brāhmin and who is a śūdra?

Descendants[edit]


Pali[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Numeral[edit]

एक

  1. Devanagari script form of eka

Sanskrit[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-Iranian *Haykas, from Proto-Indo-European *(H)óykos(one, single). Cognates include Old Latin oinos (Classical Latin ūnus), Ancient Greek οἶος(oîos) and Old English ān (English one and an). (Can this(+) etymology be sourced?)

Numeral[edit]

एक ‎(éka)

  1. one

Adjective[edit]

एक ‎(éka)

  1. (with and without एव(eva)) alone, solitary, single, happening only once, that one only
  2. the same, one and the same, identical
  3. one of two or many
  4. single of its kind, unique, singular, chief, pre-eminent, excellent
  5. sincere, truthful
  6. little, small
  7. (sometimes used as an indefinite article), a, an

Noun[edit]

एक ‎(ékam

  1. name of a teacher
  2. name of a son of रय(Raya)

Noun[edit]

एक ‎(ékan

  1. unity, a unit (at the end of a compound)

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • Sir Monier Monier-Williams (1898) A Sanskrit-English dictionary etymologically and philologically arranged with special reference to cognate Indo-European languages, Oxford: Clarendon Press, page 0227