Kaiser

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See also: kaiser, káiser, and kàiser

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
Wilhelm II - the last Kaiser of Germany from 1888 until his abdication in 1918.

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Middle English kayser, from Old High German keisar (emperor), from Proto-West Germanic *kaisar, from Proto-Germanic *kaisaraz. The native Old English descendant of that Proto-Germanic word was cāser (emperor), but the shape of Middle English kayser (emperor) suggests it was borrowed from another Germanic language rather than inherited, and the modern English spelling and sense seem to be modified after modern German rather than a direct continuation of Middle English.[1][2][3][4] Compare tsar, which was borrowed from Slavic.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Kaiser (plural Kaisers)

  1. An emperor of a German-speaking country, particularly the Holy Roman Empire (962–1806), the Austrian Empire (1806–1918), or the German Empire (1871–1918) — often specifically Wilhelm II.
  2. (by extension) Any emperor or autocrat, or one who attempts to be one.
    • 1915, T. P.'s Weekly - Volume 26, page 444:
      And Black Ivo is a veritable Kaiser.
    • 1916, The Provocation of France, page 147:
      [] that President Poincare, the first servant of France, is still Louis XIV, the former War-Lord, the Kaiser of France []
    • 1919, Far Eastern Political Science Review - Volume 1, page 49:
      Senator Sherman vigorously assailed the Shantung agreement, declaring that it would make the Mikado a veritable Kaiser of the Far East and alienate the sympathies of the 400,000,000 Chinese – from the people of the United States.
    • 1929, Through the Leaves, page 489:
      [] which, from the banking point of view, the National City Bank is a veritable kaiser.
  3. A Kaiser roll.

Translations[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Kaiser

  1. A surname.

Statistics[edit]

  • According to the 2010 United States Census, Kaiser is the 1,039th most common surname in the United States, belonging to 33,480 individuals. Kaiser is most common among White (93.15%) individuals.

References[edit]

  1. ^ caiser, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.
  2. ^ Oxford English Dictionary, 1884–1928, and First Supplement, 1933.
  3. ^ Kaiser”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–2022.
  4. ^ Kaiser”, in Dictionary.com Unabridged, Dictionary.com, LLC, 1995–present.

Anagrams[edit]


Cebuano[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English Kaiser, from German Kaiser, which see.

Proper noun[edit]

Kaiser

  1. a male given name from German

German[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German keiser, from Old High German keisur, keisar, from Proto-Germanic *kaisaraz, from Latin Caesar (Caesar). The name was borrowed into the Germanic languages as a term for "leader" at a very early date, possibly during Caesar's lifetime; it may be the oldest Latin loanword in the Germanic languages.[1][2][3]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈkaɪ̯zɐ/, [ˈkʰaɪ̯zɐ]
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

Kaiser m (strong, genitive Kaisers, plural Kaiser, feminine Kaiserin)

  1. emperor (ruler of certain monarchies; highest monarch)

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Russian: ка́йзер (kájzer, kájzɛr)

Proper noun[edit]

Kaiser m or f (proper noun, surname, masculine genitive Kaisers or (with an article) Kaiser, feminine genitive Kaiser, plural Kaisers or Kaiser)

  1. a common surname transferred from the nickname

References[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • Kaiser” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache
  • Kaiser” in Uni Leipzig: Wortschatz-Lexikon
  • Kaiser” in Duden online
  • Wikipedia-logo.svg Kaiser on the German Wikipedia.Wikipedia de

Anagrams[edit]


Hunsrik[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Kaiser m (plural Kaiser)

  1. emperor

Further reading[edit]