Lucifer

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See also: lucifer and Lúcifer

English[edit]

G.H. Frezza, Lucifer, 1704

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English Lucifer, from Latin Lūcifer, from lūx (light) + ferō (bear, carry). Attested in Old English as Lūcifer. Replaced native calque lēohtberend (lightbearer) also from the same Latin source. Application of the name to Satan results from what is probably a misinterpretation of Isaiah 14:12 (whence also the corresponding sense of morning star).

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Lucifer

  1. (literary) The planet Venus as the daystar.
    Synonym: Phosphorus
    Antonym: Vesper
  2. (biblical) The King of Babylon who was compared to the planet Venus in first the Wycliffe version then the King James Version of Isaiah 14:12; it is unclear whether this verse refers to a specific king or to a representation of the entire line of kings of Babylon.
  3. Satan, the Devil.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:Satan

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch Lucifer, from Latin Lūcifer.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈly.siˌfɛr/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: Lu‧ci‧fer

Proper noun[edit]

Lucifer m

  1. Lucifer (mythological fallen angel)

See also[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin Lūcifer.

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Lucifer ?

  1. Lucifer

Latin[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From lūx +‎ -fer, calque of Ancient Greek Φωσφόρος (Phōsphóros).

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Lūcifer m sg (genitive Lūciferī); second declension

  1. morning star, daystar, planet Venus
  2. (biblical) Lucifer
  3. (Greek mythology) Lucifer, the fabled son of Aurora and Cephalus, and father of Ceyx
  4. (poetic) day

Declension[edit]

Second-declension noun (nominative singular in -er), singular only.

Case Singular
Nominative Lūcifer
Genitive Lūciferī
Dative Lūciferō
Accusative Lūciferum
Ablative Lūciferō
Vocative Lūcifer

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • Lucifer”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • Lucifer”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • Lucifer in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • Lucifer”, in The Perseus Project (1999) Perseus Encyclopedia[1]
  • Lucifer”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • Lucifer”, in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray

Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin Lūcifer.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈliu̯sifər/
  • Hyphenation: Lu‧ci‧fer

Proper noun[edit]

Lucifer

  1. Satan; the Devil; the supreme Christian figure of evil.
  2. The planet Venus as the daystar.

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin Lūcifer. See also the inherited doublet from the same source, luceafăr.

Proper noun[edit]

Lucifer m (genitive and dative lui Lucifer)

  1. Lucifer

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin Lūcifer.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /lǔt͡sifer/
  • Hyphenation: Lu‧ci‧fer

Proper noun[edit]

Lùcifer m (Cyrillic spelling Лу̀цифер)

  1. Lucifer

Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  • Lucifer” in Hrvatski jezični portal

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin Lūcifer. See also the doublet lucífero.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): (Spain) /luθiˈfeɾ/, [lu.θiˈfeɾ]
  • IPA(key): (Latin America) /lusiˈfeɾ/, [lu.siˈfeɾ]

Proper noun[edit]

Lucifer

  1. Lucifer