Lucifer

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See also: lucifer and Lúcifer

English[edit]

G.H. Frezza, Lucifer, 1704

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English Lucifer, from Latin Lūcifer, from lūx (light) + ferō (bear, carry). Attested in Old English as Lūcifer. Replaced native calque lēohtberend (lightbearer) also from the same Latin source.

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Lucifer

  1. (literary) The planet Venus as the daystar.
    Synonym: Phosphorus
    Antonym: Vesper
  2. (biblical) The King of Babylon who named himself after the planet Venus as mentioned in the King James Version of Isaiah 14:12.
    1. A name applied to Satan by mistake by misinterpreting Isaiah 14:12.
      Synonyms: see Thesaurus:Satan

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch Lucifer, from Latin Lūcifer.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈly.siˌfɛr/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: Lu‧ci‧fer

Proper noun[edit]

Lucifer m

  1. Lucifer (mythological fallen angel)

See also[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin Lūcifer.

Proper noun[edit]

Lucifer

  1. Lucifer

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From lūx +‎ -fer, calque of Ancient Greek Φωσφόρος (Phōsphóros).

Proper noun[edit]

Lūcifer m sg (genitive Lūciferī); second declension

  1. morning star, daystar, planet Venus
  2. (biblical) Lucifer
  3. Lucifer, the fabled son of Aurora and Cephalus, and father of Ceyx
  4. (poetic) day

Declension[edit]

Second-declension noun (nominative singular in -er), singular only.

Case Singular
Nominative Lūcifer
Genitive Lūciferī
Dative Lūciferō
Accusative Lūciferum
Ablative Lūciferō
Vocative Lūcifer

Descendants[edit]

  • Aromanian: lutseafir
  • Catalan: Llucifer
  • French: Lucifer
  • English: luciferous, Lucifer

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • Lucifer in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • Lucifer in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • Lucifer in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Lucifer in The Perseus Project (1999) Perseus Encyclopedia[1]
  • Lucifer in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • Lucifer in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray

Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin Lūcifer.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈliu̯sifər/
  • Hyphenation: Lu‧ci‧fer

Proper noun[edit]

Lucifer

  1. Satan; the Devil; the supreme Christian figure of evil.
  2. The planet Venus as the daystar.

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin Lūcifer. See also the inherited doublet from the same source, luceafăr.

Proper noun[edit]

Lucifer m (genitive and dative lui Lucifer)

  1. Lucifer

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin Lūcifer.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /lǔt͡sifer/
  • Hyphenation: Lu‧ci‧fer

Proper noun[edit]

Lùcifer m (Cyrillic spelling Лу̀цифер)

  1. Lucifer

Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  • Lucifer” in Hrvatski jezični portal

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin Lūcifer. See also the doublet lucífero.

Proper noun[edit]

Lucifer

  1. Lucifer