Wiktionary:Requested entries (English)

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See also: Wiktionary:Requested entries (English)/diacritics and ligatures


Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Have an entry request? Add it to the list. - But please:

  • Think twice before adding long lists of words as they may be ignored.
  • If possible provide context, usage, field of relevance, etc.
  • Check the Wiktionary:Criteria for inclusion if you are unsure if it belongs in the dictionary.

Please remove entries from this list once they have been written (i.e. the link is “live”, shown in blue, and has a section for the correct language)

There are a few things you can do to help:

  • For inflected languages, if you see inflected forms (plurals, past tenses, superlatives, etc.) indicate the base form (singular, infinitive, absolute, etc.) of the requested term and the type of inflection used in the request.
  • For words in languages that don’t use Latin script but are listed here only in their romanized form, please add the correct form in the native script.
  • Don’t delete words just because you don’t know them — it may be that they are used only in certain contexts or are archaic or obsolete.
  • Don’t simply replace words with what you believe is the correct form. The form here may be rare or regional. Instead add the standard form and comment that the requested form seems to be an error in your experience.

Requested-entry pages for other languages: Category:Requested entries. See also: Wiktionary:Wanted entries/en.

Non-letter[edit]

Non-letter 2018[edit]

  • 5P - in textiles - 5 Pocket

A[edit]

Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

A 2017[edit]

A 2018[edit]

There is a Latin word, aestivalis, from which comes the English adjective aestival "of summer". It is used in some species names, such as Spiranthes aestivalis ("summer lady's-tresses") or Vitis aestivalis ("summer grape"). Cnilep (talk) 03:09, 8 October 2018 (UTC)
It seems like this could be a misspelling of adjudicate or abjudicate. But see [1]. Cnilep (talk) 03:21, 6 March 2018 (UTC)
Ʃkyp‑tar (talk) 22:55, 1 September 2018 (UTC)

B[edit]

Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

B 2012-2016[edit]

Tony Thorne's Dictionary of Contemporary Slang claims that the expression comes from the adjective boyed, which in turn comes from the verb to boy [2]. (We have the verb but not the adjective.) Dbfirs 22:13, 1 December 2015 (UTC)
I feel like I've heard this before. Maybe a common misconstruction/misspelling/slang alternative of bog off? Philmonte101 (talk) 13:35, 17 July 2016 (UTC)
Can't find it anywhere else, though...Kiwima (talk) 18:39, 4 December 2015 (UTC)

B 2017[edit]

Previously deleted as SoP. I have added a quote to both beta and uprising that uses the collocation. Cnilep (talk) 03:49, 11 October 2018 (UTC)
  • blue veils - OneLook - Google "blue veils" (BooksGroupsScholar): some kind of old medical treatment, possibly used on the nose?
  • bordergore: although more like an Internet slang, it refers to utterly complicated borders, filled up with an unreasonable amount of enclaves and exclaves, e.g. HRE internal borders or India-Bangladesh enclaves system.
  • bumper jack - OneLook - Google "bumper jack" (BooksGroupsScholar): a type of automobile jack that works by raising the vehicle, typically a passenger car, by its bumper. Pictures here. Generally used as an emergency jack stored in the trunk. Now mostly archaic as they aren't very safe and haven't been supplied by automobile manufacturers for decades. I think there is also another sense of bumper jack which is a large industrial jack that can lift an entire vehicle. Facts707 (talk) 14:31, 12 October 2017 (UTC)

B 2018[edit]

Common enough phrase, perhaps in allusion to this 1781 book of sonnets. But the phrase doesn't seem very idiomatic. See bevy (a group) and beauty (one who is beautiful). SoP, ne c'est pas? Cnilep (talk) 03:35, 28 May 2018 (UTC)
I've always taken beyond me as a variant of beyond my ken. We have beyond one's ken, but I'm not sure what to do about beyond one / beyond me. Free Dictionary has it from Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. OED Online has to be beyond a person as a sub-sense of beyond. Cnilep (talk) 06:06, 16 May 2018 (UTC)
Green's Dictionary of Slang gives "police car" for berry, but suggests it comes from the red lights rather than the blue uniforms. I added that sense. Cnilep (talk) 05:19, 20 June 2018 (UTC)
  • blue steel (US): A slang term used by officers to describe a robotic police aid (usually a bomb disarming or disposal robot), or a police-issue side arm.
  • boxer briefs (Greece): Greek slang. Refers to the police car.
  • Brocher -someone from Fraserburgh
  • beat your time/beat one's time
  • Brt or bartack - in textiles
  • Bull Denim - in textiles - a 3x1 twill weave piece dyed fabric, made from coarse yarns. Weights can vary from 9 ozs/sq yard up to the standard 14 ozs/sq yard. Bull Denim is essentially a denim without indigo
  • bag up- RAF speak - to bag up or chuck up. From sick bags. E.g. “I bagged up, I tell you I was blowing chunks all over the place on the Timmy”
  • bang out- RAF speak - term used to describe the action taken by a jockey when his jet goes tits up and he has to eject.
  • beer lever- RAF speak - joystick
  • bennied- RAF speak - used during tour of Falkland Islands. To have to remain in FI after date due to leave, usually due to replacement unavailability.
  • bind- RAF speak - not a nice job
  • binder- RAF speak - someone complaining
  • binding- RAF speak - complaining
  • black-outs- RAF speak - knickers worn by the WAAF, navy-blue winter-weights
  • body snatcher - RAF speak - stretcher bearer
  • boomerang- RAF speak - aircraft returned early due to snag (RAF Bomber Command)
  • body control module - a type of automotive computer
  • bodalicious – according to Urban Dictionary both bodacious and delicious; perhaps "bodaciously delicious"?
  • bootalicious – presumably a variant of bootylicious with spelling influenced by bodalicious

C[edit]

Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

C 2013-2017[edit]

Every citation for this I find uses the phrase "ctesohedonic fallacy", and every one is from Appleton's Popular Science Monthly - it looks like a protoneologism to me. Kiwima (talk) 20:33, 3 April 2017 (UTC)
  • city-beat - OneLook - Google "city-beat" (BooksGroupsScholar) – "Like Dreiser, who also spent time as a city-beat journalist, Barnes anticipates the nostalgic strain in New York writing: it's always already over, she seems to say." (Bryan Waterman, "Epilogue: Nostalgia and Counter-nostalgia" in The Cambridge Companion to the Literature of New York, edited by Cyrus R. K. Patell and Bryan Waterman, Cambridge UP, 2010, p. 235.)
SOP - this is just an attributive form for city beat, which is a beat that covers the city. Kiwima (talk) 03:43, 24 August 2017 (UTC)
I believe it's a brand, or at least a service mark, for a line of toothpaste and related products. Cnilep (talk) 02:42, 22 May 2017 (UTC)
It seems your prediction has come true -- no results past Feb 2017. I'd say no article. GeneralPericles (talk) 01:17, 20 January 2018 (UTC)
https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/are-people-identifying-as-clovergender/ says updated 30 January 2018 though, and https://www.ajc.com/news/national/the-most-outrageous-things-pharma-bro-martin-shkreli-has-ever-said-done/68JI85EScKwjwwJvXYsEYL/ came out September 2017 and http://instinctmagazine.com/post/martin-shkreli-sentenced-prison was March 2018. Perhaps we should reconsider if clovergendered is worth of a page. http://faktograf.hr/2017/11/22/istina-o-istanbulskoj-vigilare/ shows it's even made it into non-English news coverage. ScratchMarshall (talk) 01:59, 23 June 2018 (UTC)

C 2018[edit]

D[edit]

Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

D 2015-2017[edit]

D 2018[edit]

With a space draft house is sometimes used as the name of a place (pub, restaurant, bar) serving draft beer. According to the Alamo Drafthouse cinema's web site, "We pride ourselves in serving the finest craft beers", so the name may be alluding to that. Cnilep (talk) 05:12, 6 October 2018 (UTC)
Maybe not; I guess we can't be expected to be a comprehensive list of initialisms &c. I wonder if there's any precedent for corporation-specific lemmas? Azertus (talk) 10:53, 17 September 2018 (UTC)

E[edit]

Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

E 2013-2017[edit]

E 2018[edit]

F[edit]

Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

F 2011-2017[edit]

See front "face up to; confront" + up intensifier, or front up.

F 2018[edit]

Compare hand-to-mouth, hand to mouth

G[edit]

Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

G 2014-2017[edit]

See down: "With on, negative about, hostile to".

G 2018[edit]

H[edit]

Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

H 2012-2016[edit]

Could this be haem written with a ligature? That's the nearest thing I can find. Compare hæmoglobin. Cnilep (talk) 03:33, 25 December 2017 (UTC)

H 2017[edit]

H 2018[edit]

I[edit]

Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

I 2011-2017[edit]

As I read "The present and future of the Australasian colonies" (1883) from which that quote comes, the author is arguing that Australasian colonies are separate from one another, notwithstanding their relationship with Britain. In other words, since Australia and, say, New Zealand are not intestine (within a given country), a war between them would not be civil war. Cnilep (talk) 00:54, 23 September 2016 (UTC)

I 2018[edit]

J[edit]

Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

J 2016-2017[edit]

J 2018[edit]

K[edit]

Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

K 2012-2017[edit]

K 2018[edit]

L[edit]

Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

L 2013 - 2017[edit]

L 2018[edit]

Possibly a one-off: The Little Book of Lykke is the follow-up to The Little Book of Hygge. Unlike hygge, I'm not seeing much uptake. Cnilep (talk) 02:07, 9 March 2018 (UTC)

M[edit]

Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

M 2011- 2015[edit]

M 2016[edit]

M 2017[edit]

M 2018[edit]

    • 2014, David Lee Stone, Illmoor Chronicles: The Vanquish Vendetta, Hachette UK (→ISBN)
      That fruit is probably poisoned up to the hilt!' Groan sniffed. 'I don' reckon they'd try it; 'sides, I'm 'mune ta poisons.' 'Yeah, so you say,' Gordo muttered.

N[edit]

Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

N 2014-2017[edit]

I don't know... Reading this, it seems like the term might be SOP. See Norway + model. PseudoSkull (talk) 03:08, 22 October 2016 (UTC)

N 2018[edit]

O[edit]

Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

O 2014-2017[edit]

O 2018[edit]

See on the tip of one's tongue. Cnilep (talk) 02:59, 2 October 2018 (UTC)

P[edit]

Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

P 2011-2017[edit]

I wouldn't be able to answer that without knowing what "right face" and "perfect right face" mean.__Gamren (talk) 17:38, 21 January 2018 (UTC)
@Kiwima.__Gamren (talk) 18:00, 12 June 2018 (UTC)
A right face is a turn to the right, a perfect right face is when the maneuver is done neatly, with the entire body turning like a board, and everyone doing it in sync. Kiwima (talk) 21:46, 12 June 2018 (UTC)
Thanks. Most of the cites I found were in a military context, so I labeled it "especially military".__Gamren (talk) 09:25, 13 June 2018 (UTC)
  • police ambulance: probably an ambulance staffed by police, for e.g. violent or dangerous patients
If nothing else, could we find a quoted source of some kind to substantiate the phrase's usage? (just to have a place to start) Ozelot911 (talk) 14:37, 20 December 2017 (UTC)
I heard it in the 1960s Outer Limits TV series. Can also be found in Google Books. Equinox 15:48, 21 December 2017 (UTC)

P 2018[edit]

In the name Coelophysis, the meaning as with a preposition has spread to a usage without a preposition; the name is a bahuvrihi which was probably intended to mean "having hollow processes (on its bones)".

In terms of its medical application as relating to bones, "-physis" can also mean "to grow." Specifically, as the term pertains to musculoskeletal medicine and orthopedics, "physis" refers to the region of a long bone between the epiphysis and the metaphysis, or in lay terminology, the "growth plate".

Q[edit]

Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Q 2018[edit]

  • Queen's Cowboys (Canada): Royal Canadian Mounted Police; in reference to the Stetson hats worn by RCMP members in ceremonial dress (red serge) and to the origin of the force where they were often the only representatives of the British Crown and later, the Canadian government, in rural parts of Canada.

R[edit]

Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

R 2012-2017[edit]

Apparently Korean for "hamlet, village cluster", it is a unit of governance in the DPRK. Cnilep (talk) 02:54, 19 April 2018 (UTC)
  • rouanne
    • The OED entry for maverick quotes the Overland Monthly of August 1869 for a possible etymology:
      • One Maverick formerly owned such immense herds that many of his animals unavoidably escaped his rouanne in the spring, were taken up by his neighbors, branded and called ‘mavericks’.
        • Escaped his rouanne? It's French for the horse colour 'roan' and for the kind of compass you stick into the boy in front's bottom in a quiet maths class, but I can't see what it means here. --46.226.49.229 14:53, 5 January 2017 (UTC)
          • rouanne, rouannette are also apparently (obsolete?) French for "a mark (for casks)": the above would seem to refer to animals escaping a cattle brand so that other farmers manage to claim them instead. Equinox 15:57, 6 July 2018 (UTC)
SoP? See the economics sense of real + GDP; generally contrasted with nominal GDP. Seems rather more encyclopedic than usual Wiktionary fare. Cnilep (talk) 06:12, 8 June 2017 (UTC)

R 2018[edit]

S[edit]

Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

S 2011-2017[edit]

See stellae, stella. Cnilep (talk) 06:01, 22 February 2017 (UTC)
  • stenopæic
  • think the sun shines out of someone's ass (could be bum, backside etc, and could be "act like","treat like", "as far as he's concerned" etc)
  • sutorious — adjectives from the Latin sūtōrius (of or belonging to a shoemaker or cobbler)
Apparently sutorian is a variant of sutorial. There is a plant genus Sutorious and possibly some bird species, but I can't find the word used as an adjective. Cnilep (talk) 08:18, 19 July 2016 (UTC)
OED gives this as a variant of sutorial with one exemplar, Thomas Blount's Glossographia. Blount defines Sutorious (sutorius) as “belonging to a Shoomaker, or Sewer”. The word appears just after Sutor (“a Shoomaker, a Sewer”), which he notes is Latin. Sutorius does not appear in Blount's (1707) Glossographia Anglicana Nova. I haven't found other examples in English. I would say that sutorious is a Latin word, not sufficiently attested in English. Cnilep (talk) 02:17, 25 January 2018 (UTC)
Isn't this SOP? Kiwima (talk) 22:49, 8 December 2016 (UTC)
  • schweff: slang for a flirt or "mack", a man who is (or tries to be) good with the ladies? Is in Partridge's slang dictionary. Equinox 06:19, 18 November 2016 (UTC)
While Partridge emphasizes flirting, attestations on the web seem like comments on masculinity and social class – a bit like a (US) douchebag or a twit. [21], [22] Cnilep (talk) 04:19, 30 January 2018 (UTC)
I can only find cites by one author (Alexander Macalister) - it seams to be some sort of sheath in the shoulder joint of an insect. Need cites by more authors. Kiwima (talk) 04:43, 4 December 2016 (UTC)
Doesn't this seem sort of SoP? (Just saying that because I also found spinning kick. Could one find the definition of this term at spinning + backfist? Philmonte101 (talk) 04:55, 1 August 2016 (UTC)
Looks SOP to me - it is a club for swingers. Kiwima (talk) 22:49, 8 December 2016 (UTC)
I can only find two actual usages - one in the bible and one in a novel of the life of David - all else is just commentary on or speculation about the meaning of the word. This is not sufficient to meet our attestation criteria. Kiwima (talk) 02:31, 30 July 2017 (UTC)
I can't find it in recent books. It is attested on the web, mainly from 2016-2017. There are currently entries for both SJW and -tard. Since the suffix is productive, there could be any number of similar terms with sporadic attestation. Cnilep (talk) 03:57, 31 January 2018 (UTC)

S 2018[edit]

  • Hmmm... doesn't seem attested to me. That's unfortunate; looks like an interesting entry if it exists. Can @Kiwima find any citations for this? PseudoSkull (talk) 02:42, 23 March 2018 (UTC)
Yeah, I looked and didn't find it either. Kiwima (talk) 03:21, 23 March 2018 (UTC)
Geertz & Geertz call it a “term [] in Balinese” and use italics on first mention (p. 30). Is it attested as a loanword in English? There is no request page for Balinese, but I wonder if editors on Wiktionary:Requested entries (Indonesian) could help with the Balinese lemma? Cnilep (talk) 02:57, 31 January 2018 (UTC)

T[edit]

Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

T 2011-2015[edit]

See torpedo slang sense, “a large breast; breast with a large nipple”. Cnilep (talk) 01:33, 29 January 2018 (UTC)

T 2016[edit]

T 2017[edit]

    • 2008, Prøveoplæg Til Kulturfagene, Gyldendal Uddannelse →ISBN, page 171
      I kilde 3 finder du en kritik af, at indvandrere "systematisk" forskelsbehandles, ...
      In source 3, you will find a critique of the fact that immigrants are "systematically" discriminated against, ...

except the original author doesn't explicitly express that the fact that immigrants are systematically discriminated against is in fact a fact. I also do not know what POS to give it, if I were to make the entry.__Gamren (talk) 18:09, 29 April 2017 (UTC)

Feels SoP to me, since it's not always a fact ("I hate the idea that artists suffer more than anyone else"), and "the fact that X" can be used as a normal NP anywhere. Equinox 18:21, 29 April 2017 (UTC)

T 2018[edit]

The 2018[edit]

In some cases adding "the" definitely changes the meaning (like "underground" meaning below-ground generally vs. "the underground" meaning the subway). In some cases it does not, and the core word or phrase is all that's needed. It's unclear to me in which cases usage notes should be added to the core word or phrase vs. creating a separate entry, and in which cases redirects should be created. These were all previously at Appendix:English idioms; I weeded out the ones that were obviously not needed. -- Beland (talk) 08:24, 16 June 2018 (UTC)

Consider Both London and Moscow have undergrounds. I can't name a city with more than 5 million in population that shouldn't have an underground. Different determiners (including the "zero" determiner), different referents, same semantics for the noun. The performs its normal function of specifying the most salient (eg, local) instance of the noun it determines. In London "the underground" refers to all or part of their system. There may be some instances where the makes some other semantic change, but I am sure those instances are rare. DCDuring (talk) 23:22, 11 September 2018 (UTC)
Examples are the finger and the man. Such cases are rare indeed.  --Lambiam 15:30, 6 October 2018 (UTC)
In addition, do you suggest that we have separate entries for attributive use of the nouns whenever such use is attested, even though the noun's semantics are the same? DCDuring (talk) 23:43, 11 September 2018 (UTC)
I'm not from the UK, so I'm not confident in my ability to judge correct usage. Those examples sound plausible, so then underground probably covers it. It currently lists "underground" in the sense of the stuff below the surface of the Earth as an adjective, so that would explain why using "the" restricts the meaning to "subway" or "secret organization". For "secret organization" there's just a note that "the" is usually used with the noun, and that seems sufficient to me. I'll drop it from this todo list. As for the other listings, I think we need to think through them on a case-by-case basis to see how firmly attatched to "the" they are, and whether this justifies a separate listing, usage note, or neither. -- Beland (talk) 18:23, 18 October 2018 (UTC)

U[edit]

Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

U 2018[edit]

This was previously deleted as SoP, but Collins, M-W, and Oxford each include it as an idiom or phrase. Cnilep (talk) 03:21, 2 May 2018 (UTC)

V[edit]

Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

V 2012 - 2017[edit]

2018[edit]

W[edit]

Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

W 2012-2017[edit]

  • weak point
  • whitile - Other dictionaries list this as a synonym for yaffle but I can find now usage. Kiwima (talk) 00:58, 5 December 2017 (UTC)
  • whoopeeing up "The puritanical Gandhi was convinced that men and women should never make whoopee except for the express purpose of whoopeeing up some offspring." Based on a True Story, page 380. --- SoP from Whoopee as a verb meaning to make whoopee. Kiwima (talk) 02:02, 24 April 2015 (UTC) And/or a pun on whip up. Equinox 18:51, 11 December 2015 (UTC)
  • withamit
  • withvine - alt form of withwine, but I can't find enough cites. Kiwima (talk) 02:58, 9 January 2017 (UTC)
  • woden
  • wolman
  • work sharp - Said of a pregnant woman who experiences a burst of nervous energy in the 24 / 48 hours prior to the onset of labour. May also be used of a similar phenomenon in a woman just prior to the onset of menstruation. Southern England. Colloquial.
  • worthy poor
  • wraster
Some computer languages (Java?) use it for a type of raster, and Wraster is a name, but otherwise this seems largely unattested. Cnilep (talk) 01:55, 29 January 2018 (UTC)

W 2018[edit]

X[edit]

Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

X 2018[edit]

Y[edit]

Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Y 2012-2017[edit]

  • yakamilk: synonym of trumpeter (bird in the family Psophiidae), but I can't find sufficient cites.
  • yakoots: ?? Yakoots?? Or perhaps the Indian word for rubies, sapphires, and oriental topaz?
  • yeldrine
Webster 1913 suggests yeldrin or yeldrine, but I can't find any attestation with the final -e. Cnilep (talk) 02:25, 2 May 2018 (UTC)

Y 2018[edit]

Z[edit]

Section: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Z 2015[edit]

Z 2018[edit]

References and notes[edit]

This section is meant to assist in the production of definitions by providing supporting citations. Wherever possible, please keep supporting evidence with the entries it is meant to be supporting.