adagio

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See also: adágio and adagiò

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Italian adagio.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /əˈdɑːd͡ʒiəʊ/, /əˈdæd͡ʒiəʊ/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

adagio (plural adagios)

  1. (music) A tempo mark directing that a passage is to be played rather slowly, leisurely and gracefully.
  2. (music) A passage having this mark.
  3. (dance) A male-female duet or mixed trio ballet displaying demanding balance, spins and/or lifts.

Translations[edit]

Adverb[edit]

adagio (not comparable)

  1. (music) Played rather slowly.

Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

adagio (not comparable)

  1. (music) Describing a passage having this mark.

Translations[edit]

Basque[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Ultimately from Latin adagium.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /adaɡio/ [a.ð̞a.ɣ̞i.o]
  • Rhymes: -io
  • Hyphenation: a‧da‧gi‧o

Adverb[edit]

adagio (not comparable)

  1. (music) adagio

Noun[edit]

adagio inan

  1. (music) adagio

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /aːˈdaː.dʒoː/, /aːˈdaː.(d)ʒi.oː/
  • Hyphenation: ada‧gio

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin adagium.

Noun[edit]

adagio n (plural adagios, diminutive adagiootje n)

  1. adage
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from Italian adagio.

Noun[edit]

adagio n (plural adagios, diminutive adagiootje n)

  1. (music, dance) adagio

Adverb[edit]

adagio

  1. (music) adagio

Adjective[edit]

adagio (not comparable)

  1. (music) describing a passage having this mark
Inflection[edit]
Declension of adagio
uninflected adagio
inflected adagio
comparative
positive
predicative/adverbial adagio
indefinite m./f. sing. adagio
n. sing. adagio
plural adagio
definite adagio
partitive

References[edit]

  • M. J. Koenen & J. Endepols, Verklarend Handwoordenboek der Nederlandse Taal (tevens Vreemde-woordentolk), Groningen, Wolters-Noordhoff, 1969 (26th edition) [Dutch dictionary in Dutch]

French[edit]

French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Italian adagio.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

adagio

  1. (music) adagio

Noun[edit]

adagio m (plural adagios)

  1. (music) adagio

Further reading[edit]

Indonesian[edit]

Noun[edit]

adagio (first-person possessive adagioku, second-person possessive adagiomu, third-person possessive adagionya)

  1. adagio

Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /aˈda.d͡ʒo/
  • Rhymes: -adʒo
  • Hyphenation: a‧dà‧gio

Etymology 1[edit]

Univerbation of ad (at) +‎ agio (ease).

Adverb[edit]

adagio (superlative adagissimo)

  1. slowly

Noun[edit]

adagio m (plural adagi)

  1. (music) adagio
Descendants[edit]
  • Portuguese: adágio

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

adagio

  1. first-person singular present indicative of adagiare

Etymology 3[edit]

From Latin adagium.

Noun[edit]

adagio m (plural adagi)

  1. proverb, adage or saying
Descendants[edit]

See also[edit]

Latin[edit]

Noun[edit]

adā̆giō f (genitive adā̆giōnis); third declension

  1. Alternative form of adā̆gium

Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative adā̆giō adā̆giōnēs
Genitive adā̆giōnis adā̆giōnum
Dative adā̆giōnī adā̆giōnibus
Accusative adā̆giōnem adā̆giōnēs
Ablative adā̆giōne adā̆giōnibus
Vocative adā̆giō adā̆giōnēs

Noun[edit]

adā̆giō

  1. dative/ablative singular of adā̆gium

References[edit]

  • adagio”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • adagio in Ramminger, Johann (2016 July 16 (last accessed)) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[2], pre-publication website, 2005-2016

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Bokmål Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nb

Etymology[edit]

From Italian adagio (slowly).[1]

Adverb[edit]

adagio

  1. (music) adagio

Noun[edit]

adagio m (definite singular adagioen, indefinite plural adagioer, definite plural adagioene)

  1. (music) an adagio

Usage notes[edit]

  • Prior to a revision in 2020, this noun was also considered grammatically neuter.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ “adagio” in The Bokmål Dictionary.
  2. ^ Language Council of Norway, Spelling decisions since 2012 (in Norwegian, retrieved 12.21.20)

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Italian adagio (slowly).[1]

Adverb[edit]

adagio

  1. (music) adagio

Noun[edit]

adagio m (definite singular adagioen, indefinite plural adagioar, definite plural adagioane)

  1. (music) an adagio

Usage notes[edit]

  • Prior to a revision in 2020, this noun was also considered grammatically neuter.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ “adagio” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.
  2. ^ Language Council of Norway, Spelling decisions since 2012 (in Norwegian, retrieved 12.21.20)

Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Unadapted borrowing from Italian adagio.[1][2] First attested in 1823.[3]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

adagio n (indeclinable)

  1. (music) adagio (a tempo mark directing that a passage is to be played rather slowly, leisurely and gracefully)
  2. (music) adagio (a passage having this mark)
  3. (dance) adagio (a male-female duet or mixed trio ballet displaying demanding balance, spins and/or lifts)

Declension[edit]

Indeclinable, or rarely:

Adjective[edit]

adagio (not comparable, no derived adverb)

  1. (music) adagio (describing a passage having this mark)

Adverb[edit]

adagio (not comparable)

  1. (music) adagio (played rather slowly)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mirosław Bańko, Lidia Wiśniakowska (2021) “adagio”, in Wielki słownik wyrazów obcych, →ISBN
  2. ^ Witold Doroszewski, editor (1958–1969), “adagio”, in Słownik języka polskiego (in Polish), Warszawa: PWN
  3. ^ Kurjer Warszawski[1] (in Polish), volume 3, t.2, number 167, 1823, page 1

Further reading[edit]

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Italian adagio.

Noun[edit]

adagio n (uncountable)

  1. adagio

Declension[edit]

Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /aˈdaxjo/ [aˈð̞a.xjo]
  • Audio (Colombia:(file)
  • Rhymes: -axjo
  • Syllabification: a‧da‧gio

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Italian adagio.

Adverb[edit]

adagio

  1. (music) adagio

Noun[edit]

adagio m (plural adagios)

  1. (music) adagio

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from Latin adagium.

Noun[edit]

adagio m (plural adagios)

  1. adage (old saying)

Further reading[edit]

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Italian adagio.

Adverb[edit]

adagio

  1. (music) adagio (slowly)

Noun[edit]

adagio n

  1. (music) adagio

Declension[edit]

Declension of adagio 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative adagio adagiot adagion adagiona
Genitive adagios adagiots adagions adagionas

References[edit]