alpaca

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See also: Alpacca and alpacca

English[edit]

geographic distribution
of the alpaca
An alpaca (Vicugna pacos)

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Spanish alpaca, from Aymara allpaqa.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ælˈpækə/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ækə

Noun[edit]

alpaca (countable and uncountable, plural alpacas or alpaca)

  1. A sheep-like domesticated animal of the Andes, Vicugna pacos, in the camel family, closely related to the llama, guanaco, and vicuña.
  2. (uncountable) Wool from the alpaca, with strong very long fibres and coloring from black to brown to white.
    • 1918 [1915], Thomas Burke, Nights in London[1], New York: Henry Holt and Company:
      A lady in frayed alpaca, carrying a house-flannel, came to hearken.
  3. A garment made of such wool.
    • 1897, Richard Marsh, The Beetle:
      The dress was at the bottom, — it was an alpaca, of a pretty shade in blue, bedecked with lace and ribbons, as is the fashion of the hour, and lined with sea-green silk.

Synonyms[edit]

Coordinate terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Gujarati: અલ્પાકા (alpākā)
  • Thai: อัลปากา (an-bpaa-gâa)

Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Spanish alpaca, from Aymara allpaqa.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

alpaca f (plural alpaques)

  1. alpaca (animal, fiber, and textile)
  2. nickel silver
    Synonyms: argentan, plata alemanya

Further reading[edit]

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Spanish alpaca, from Aymara allpaqa.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˌɑlˈpaː.kaː/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: al‧pa‧ca

Noun[edit]

alpaca m (plural alpaca's, diminutive alpacaatje n)

  1. alpaca

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Spanish, possibly via English, from Aymara allpaqa.

Noun[edit]

alpaca m (genitive singular alpaca, nominative plural alpacaí)

  1. alpaca

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
alpaca n-alpaca halpaca not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]

  • alpaca”, in New English-Irish Dictionary, Foras na Gaeilge, 2013–2024

Italian[edit]

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Spanish alpaca, from Aymara allpaqa.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /alˈpa.ka/, (traditional) /ˈal.pa.ka/[1]
  • Rhymes: -aka, (traditional) -alpaka
  • Hyphenation: al‧pà‧ca, (traditional) àl‧pa‧ca

Noun[edit]

alpaca m (invariable)

  1. alpaca (Vicugna pacos)
  2. (uncountable) alpaca (wool)
  3. (uncountable) a fabric made out of a mixture of wool and cotton

References[edit]

  1. ^ alpaca in Luciano Canepari, Dizionario di Pronuncia Italiana (DiPI)

Further reading[edit]

  • alpaca in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Portuguese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

 
  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /awˈpa.kɐ/ [aʊ̯ˈpa.kɐ]
    • (Southern Brazil) IPA(key): /awˈpa.ka/ [aʊ̯ˈpa.ka]

  • Rhymes: -akɐ
  • Hyphenation: al‧pa‧ca

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Spanish alpaca, from Aymara allpaqa.

Noun[edit]

alpaca f (plural alpacas)

  1. alpaca (Vicugna pacos, a camelid of the Andes)
  2. alpaca (wool from the alpaca)
Coordinate terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

alpaca f (uncountable)

  1. nickel silver (alloy of copper, zinc and nickel)

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French alpaga, alpaca, from Spanish alpaca, from Aymara allpaqa.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /al.paˈka/
  • Rhymes: -a
  • Hyphenation: al‧pa‧ca

Noun[edit]

alpaca f (plural alpacale)

  1. alpaca (animal)
  2. alpaca (wool)

Declension[edit]

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Aymara allpaqa.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /alˈpaka/ [alˈpa.ka]
  • Rhymes: -aka
  • Syllabification: al‧pa‧ca

Noun[edit]

alpaca f (plural alpacas)

  1. alpaca

Coordinate terms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

All borrowings ultimately from Spanish, though for some direct paths are uncertain.

Further reading[edit]