cello

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Cello, çello, -cello, and 'cello

English[edit]

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A cello.

Etymology 1[edit]

A clipping of the original name violoncello, from Italian violoncello (little violone), from violone (an early form of the double bass) + -cello (-elle, forming diminutives), violone (big viola) itself being derived from viola + -one (-oon, forming augmentatives).

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cello (plural cellos or celli)

  1. A large unfretted stringed instrument of the violin family with four strings tuned (lowest to highest) C-G-D-A and an endpin to support its weight, usually played with a bow.
    • 2006 Nov. 22, Rob Paravonian, "Pachabel Rant", 00:00:33:
      I haven't always been this cool because I haven't always played guitar. I started out on the cello. Yeah, the cello is a wonderful, beautiful instrument. It's cool to be an adult that plays the cello. Being a kid that played the cello sucked, cause there's no way to be cool when your instrument is larger than you. When you walk to school with a cello you're like a wounded gazelle on the Serengeti, man. The bullies just smell you coming from a mile away.
    • 2020 Aug. 9, Jeffrey Meyers, "Fitzgerald and Hemingway: A Tortured Friendship", The Article:
      Fitzgerald saw that Hemingway, oppressed by his mother's influence, was "still rebelling against having been made to take cello lessons when growing up."
    Synonym: violoncello
Meronyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Tokelauan: helo
Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  • Robin Stowell (1999) The Cambridge Companion to the Cello, page 1

Etymology 2[edit]

Shortening of cellophane.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cello (uncountable)

  1. cellophane
    • 2011, Ava Carroll-Brown, Where Is Your Mother?:
      Chocolates arranged in a candy dish or basket, antique or purchased in accordance to[sic] the personal taste of the host/hostess, wrapped with cello wrap and tied with a lovely ribbon—decadent!

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Noun[edit]

cello c (singular definite celloen, plural indefinite celloer)

  1. cello

Inflection[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

Etymology[edit]

Shortening of violoncello, from Italian violoncello. Influenced by German Cello.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈtʃɛ.loː/, /ˈsɛ.loː/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: cel‧lo

Noun[edit]

cello m (plural cello's, diminutive cellootje n)

  1. cello

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

From Italian violoncello

Noun[edit]

cello m (definite singular celloen, indefinite plural celloer, definite plural celloene)

  1. cello

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Etymology[edit]

From Italian violoncello

Noun[edit]

cello m (definite singular celloen, indefinite plural celloar, definite plural celloane)

  1. cello

References[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Unadapted borrowing from Italian cello.

Noun[edit]

cello n (uncountable)

  1. cello

Declension[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

cello c

  1. cello

Declension[edit]

Declension of cello 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative cello cellon cellor, celli cellorna
Genitive cellos cellons cellors, cellis cellornas

Related terms[edit]