peg

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See also: Peg and PEG

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English pegge, from Middle Dutch pegge ‎(pin, peg), from Old Saxon *pigg-, *pegg-, from Proto-Germanic *pig-, *pag- ‎(peg, stake), from Proto-Indo-European *bak-, *baḱ- ‎(club, pointed stick, peg). Cognate with Dutch dialectal peg ‎(pin), Low German pig, pigge ‎(peg, stick with a point), Low German pegel ‎(post, stake), Swedish pigg ‎(tooth, spike), Irish bac ‎(stick, crook), Latin baculum ‎(staff), Latvian bakstît ‎(to poke), Ancient Greek βάκτρον ‎(báktron, staff, walking stick). Related to beak.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

peg ‎(plural pegs)

  1. A cylindrical wooden or metal object used to fasten or as a bearing between objects.
  2. Measurement between the pegs: after killing an animal hunters used the distance between a peg near the animal's nose and one near the end of its body to measure its body length.
  3. A protrusion used to hang things on.
    Hang your coat on the peg and come in.
  4. (figuratively) A support; a reason; a pretext.
    a peg to hang a claim upon
  5. (cribbage) A peg moved on a crib board to keep score.
  6. (finance) A fixed exchange rate, where a currency's value is matched to the value of another currency or measure such as gold
  7. (UK) A small quantity of a strong alcoholic beverage.
    • Harper's Magazine
      This over, the club will be visited for a "peg," Anglice drink.
    • 1953, S. S. Field, The American drink book‎, page 65:
      The name had come to mean any aromatic essence of herbs by the time the first thirsty colonial poured a peg of Who-shot-John into his mint water.
  8. A place formally allotted for fishing
  9. (colloquial, dated) A leg or foot.
    • 1913, D.H. Lawrence, Sons and Lovers, chapter 2
      "Now I'm cleaned up for thee: tha's no 'casions ter stir a peg all day, but sit and read thy books."
  10. One of the pins of a musical instrument, on which the strings are strained.
    • William Shakespeare: Othello, Act 2, Scene I:
      O, you are well tuned now!
      But I'll set down the pegs that make this music,
      As honest as I am.
  11. A step; a degree.
    • Barrow
      to screw papal authority to the highest peg
    • Hudibras
      We still have worsted all your holy tricks; / Trepann'd your party with intrigue, / And took your grandees down a peg []
  12. Short for clothes peg.

Synonyms[edit]

  • (small quantity of strong liquor): shot

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

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Verb[edit]

peg ‎(third-person singular simple present pegs, present participle pegging, simple past and past participle pegged)

  1. To fasten using a peg.
    Let's peg the rug to the floor.
  2. To affix or pin.
    I found a tack and pegged your picture to the bulletin board.
    She lunged forward and pegged him to the wall.
  3. To fix a value or price.
    China's currency is no longer pegged to the American dollar.
  4. To narrow the cuff openings of a pair of pants so that the legs take on a peg shape.
  5. To throw.
  6. To indicate or ascribe an attribute to. (Assumed to originate from the use of pegs or pins as markers on a bulletin board or a list.)
    He's been pegged as a suspect.
    I pegged his weight at 165.
  7. (cribbage) To move one's pegs to indicate points scored; to score with a peg.
    She pegged twelve points.
  8. (slang) To reach or exceed the maximum value on a scale or gauge.
    We pegged the speedometer across the flats.
  9. (slang, typically in heterosexual contexts) To engage in anal sex by penetrating one's male partner with a dildo
    • 2007, Violet Blue, The Adventurous Couple's Guide to Strap-On Sex[1], ISBN 157344278X, page 32:
      When you're pegging him and he gets close to orgasm, you'll observe a number of physical signs []

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

peg

  1. imperative of pege

Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

peg

  1. peg