cloaca

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See also: cloacă and clóáca

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
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Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin cloāca (sewer), from cluō (cleanse; purge).[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cloaca (plural cloacas or cloacae)

  1. (sometimes figuratively) A sewer.
    • 1773, Gentleman's Magazine, No. 43, p. 598:
      The Thames, polluted with the filthy effusions of the cloacae.
    • 1850, Thomas Carlyle, Latter-day Pamphlets, Ch. iv, p. 46:
    • [] that tremendous cloaca of Pauperism []
  2. (zoology) The duct in reptiles, amphibians and birds, as well as most fish and some mammals, which serves as the common outlet for urination, defecation, and reproduction.
    • 1822, John Mason Good, The Study of Medicine, Vol. I, p. 7:
      In birds the rectum, at the termination of its canal, forms an oval or elongated pouch [] and then expands into a cavity, which has been named cloaca.
  3. An outhouse or lavatory.
    • 1840, Frederick Marryat, Olla Podrida, Ch. xxiv:
      To every house [] a cloaca.
  4. (anatomy) A duct through which gangrenous material escapes a body.
    • 1846, Frederick Brittan translating Joseph François Malgaigne as Manual of Operative Surgery, p. 172
      Across this shell [sc. of bone] small holes are eaten, by which the matter escapes, and which are called cloacae (Weidmann).

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Oxford English Dictionary. "cloaca, n." Oxford University Press (Oxford), 1891.

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin cloaca.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˌkloːˈaː.kaː/
  • Hyphenation: clo‧a‧ca

Noun[edit]

cloaca f (plural cloaca's)

  1. (zoology) cloaca (duct in certain vertebrates used for reproduction and excreting digestive waste)

Derived terms[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin cloaca. Cognate to the inherited doublet chiavica.

Noun[edit]

cloaca f (plural cloache)

  1. sewer
  2. cesspit, cesspool
  3. (anatomy) cloaca

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From cluō (cleanse).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cloāca f (genitive cloācae); first declension

  1. A sewer or underground drain
  2. (humorous) The stomach of a drunken or voracious woman

Inflection[edit]

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative cloāca cloācae
Genitive cloācae cloācārum
Dative cloācae cloācīs
Accusative cloācam cloācās
Ablative cloācā cloācīs
Vocative cloāca cloācae

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • cloaca in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • cloaca in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • cloaca in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • cloaca in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • cloaca in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin cloaca.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cloaca f (plural cloacas)

  1. (anatomy) cloaca (excretory and genital duct in bird, reptiles and fish)

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin cloāca (sewer), from cluō (cleanse).

Noun[edit]

cloaca f (plural cloacas)

  1. sewer, storm drain
  2. (zoology) cloaca