emasculate

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin emasculare[1] or emasculō (to emasculate), from ē- (a variant of ex- (suffix denoting privation), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁eǵʰs (out)) + masculus (male, masculine; a man) + (suffix forming verbs). Masculus is derived from mās (a man, a male) +‎ -culus (suffix forming a diminutive of a noun).

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Adjective[edit]

emasculate (comparative more emasculate, superlative most emasculate)

  1. Deprived of virility or vigor; unmanned, weak.

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

emasculate (third-person singular simple present emasculates, present participle emasculating, simple past and past participle emasculated)

  1. (transitive) To deprive of virile or procreative power; to castrate, to geld. [from early 17th c.]
  2. (transitive) To deprive of masculine vigor or spirit; to weaken; to render effeminate; to vitiate by unmanly softness. [from early 17th c.]
    • 1795, [Vicesimus Knox], “Section II. Oriental Manners, and the Ideas Imbibed in Youth, both in the West and East Indies, Favourable to the Spirit of Depotism”, in The Spirit of Despotism, London: [s.n.], OCLC 518868465, page 13:
      A hardy race, in ungenial climates, with nerves ſtrung by the northern blaſt, though little refined by knowledge, felt in an early age, the ſentiments of manly virtue, and ſpurned the baſeneſs of ſlavery. Luxury had not emaſculated their minds; and they threw off, with native elaſticity, the burden of unjuſt dominion.
  3. (transitive, botany) Of a flower: to deprive of the anthers.

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