ent

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: Ent, ENT, ént, ënt, ent-, and -ent

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Learned borrowing from Old English ent (giant), from Proto-West Germanic *anti; introduced by J. R. R. Tolkien in The Lord of the Rings, 1954–55.

Noun[edit]

ent (plural ents) (feminine entwife)

  1. (fantasy) A fictional, large, humanoid, mobile talking tree in works by J. R. R. Tolkien.
    • 2001, Stephen King and Peter Straub, p133 The Talisman:
      Ents and Entwives, Jack thought crazily. BAD Ents and Entwives.
    • 2003, Walter Scheps, "The Fairy-tale Morality of The Lord of the Rings", in Jared Lobdell (ed.), A Tolkien Compass
      [] and that fine young ent Quickbeam is merely a minor crux in an Old English glossary (the name Quickbeam means 'living tree' in Old English).
    • 2003, Colin Duriez, Tolkien and C. S. Lewis: The Gift of Friendship
      Tolkien's Treebeard, his Ent creation, was inspired by Lewis, especially his sometimes emphatic deep voice
    • 2003, Ralph C. Wood, The Gospel According to Tolkien: Visions of the Kingdom in Middle-earth
      Tolkien perhaps speaks for himself when he has Treebeard confess that "nobody cares for the woods as I care for them," and when this same Ent also warns that "the withering of all woods may be drawing near"
    • 2003, Allen Paterson, p180 Trees for Your Garden:
      But this should not lead to complete avoidance, as if it is like some dire incursion of triffids or ents.
    • 2003, Robert Dunn, p98 Horse Latitudes:
      Somewhere, ents and manitous laugh grimly For, despite all this, the trees lasted much longer Than most of the presents, and all of the holiday spirit.
    • 2006, John Allran, p37 Men of Their Word:
      Hello, my good friend, myself I present. Not human, nor tree, for I am an ent.
    • 2004, Paola Amico and James Beletic, page xxvi Scientific Detectors for Astronomy: The Beginning of a New Era:
      The Ents are a race of giant, tree-like people. Their purpose is to protect the electrons, though some align themselves with holes. However, as the great arrays have grown, the number of Ents has dwindled. Now they are said only to be found in the darkest and most mysterious of laboratories.

Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Possibly from empty, through assimilation of the "m" to the following "t"

Verb[edit]

ent (third-person singular simple present ents, present participle enting, simple past and past participle ented)

  1. (dialect, Britain, Devon) To empty or pour.
    • 1976, K. C. Phillips: Westcountry Words and Ways, David & Charles, Newton Abbot, 1976, p. 47
      A Truro correspondent remembers being sent to buy a teapot with the admonition 'and see he got a good ent to un'; that is, of course, a good 'pour'.
      "Enting down with rain" is still occasionally heard.

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch ente, from enten (to graft) (modern Dutch enten), from Old French enter, from Latin imputāre.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛnt
  • IPA(key): /ɛnt/

Noun[edit]

ent m (plural enten, diminutive entje n)

  1. graft (particularly on a tree)

Verb[edit]

ent

  1. first-, second- and third-person singular present indicative of enten
  2. imperative of enten

Anagrams[edit]


Estonian[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

ent

  1. but

Ladin[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

ent m (plural enc)

  1. entity
  2. corporation, body

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *anti, from unknown origin. Cognate with Gothic 𐌰𐌽𐍄- (ant-, giant-, prefix).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ent m (nominative plural entas)

  1. giant

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle English: eont
  • English: ent

Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *antiz (giant), of unknown origin. Cognate with Old English ent, Gothic 𐌰𐌽𐍄- (ant-, giant-, prefix).

Noun[edit]

ent m

  1. giant

Declension[edit]


Derived terms[edit]