inexorable

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French inexorable, from Latin inexōrābilis (relentless, inexorable) (or directly from the Latin word), from in- (prefix meaning ‘not’) + exōrābilis (that may be moved or persuaded by entreaty; exorable).[1] Exōrābilis is derived from exōrāre[2] (from exōrō (to persuade, win over; to beg, entreat, plead), from ex- (prefix meaning ‘out of’) + ōrō (to beg, entreat, plead, pray; to deliver a speech, orate), from ōs (mouth), from Proto-Indo-European *h₃éh₁os (mouth)) + -bilis (suffix forming adjectives indicating a capacity or worth of being acted upon).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

inexorable (comparative more inexorable, superlative most inexorable)

  1. Impossible to prevent or stop; inevitable. [from mid 16th c.]
    • 2018, Anne Perkins, A Dad’s Army-style Brexit looms. ‘Don’t panic! in the Guardian.[1]
      No one, today, can miss the inexorable unfolding across the headlines and social media timelines of a transformed relationship between Britain and Europe.
  2. Unable to be persuaded; relentless; unrelenting. [from mid 16th c.]
  3. Adamant; severe.

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin inexorabilis.

Adjective[edit]

inexorable (masculine and feminine plural inexorables)

  1. inexorable

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin inexōrābilis.

Adjective[edit]

inexorable (plural inexorables)

  1. inexorable

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin inexorabilis.

Adjective[edit]

inexorable (plural inexorables)

  1. inexorable

Related terms[edit]