missa

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the Latin phrase Ite, missa est (Go, it is the dismissal/sending), reinterpreted as naming the ceremony: "Go, it is the Mass", or "Go, the Mass is over"; from perfect passive participle missus (dismissal, sending), from mittere (send, verb).

Noun[edit]

missa

  1. (music) a mass, in the sense of a composition setting several sung parts of the liturgic service (most often chosen from the ordinary parts Kyrie, Gloria, Credo, Agnus Dei and/or Sanctus) to music, notably when the text in Latin is used (as long universally prescribed by Rome)

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin missa, from Latin missum.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

missa f (plural misses)

  1. mass

Faroese[edit]

Verb[edit]

at missa (third person singular past indicative misti, supine mist)

  1. to lose

Conjugation[edit]


Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse missa.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

missa (weak verb, third-person singular past indicative missti, supine misst)

  1. to lose

Conjugation[edit]


Italian[edit]

Verb[edit]

missa

  1. third-person singular present indicative of missare
  2. second-person singular imperative of missare

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Found in Late Latin, Vulgar Latin, and Ecclesiastical Latin. From missus.

Noun[edit]

missa f (genitive missae); first declension

  1. Mass; Christian eucharistic liturgy

Descendants[edit]

Participle[edit]

missa

  1. nominative feminine singular of missus
  2. nominative neuter plural of missus
  3. accusative neuter plural of missus
  4. vocative feminine singular of missus
  5. vocative neuter plural of missus

missā

  1. ablative feminine singular of missus

Old Norse[edit]

Verb[edit]

missa

  1. to miss, lose

Old Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin missa (mass), from Latin mittō (I send), from Proto-Indo-European *meyth₂-, *mith₂- (to exchange, remove).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

missa f (plural missas)

  1. (Christianity) mass (religious service)
    • 13th century, attributed to Alfonso X of Castile, Cantigas de Santa Maria, E codex, cantiga 2 (facsimile):
      Eſta é de como ſta maria pareceu en toledo a ſant alifonſſo ⁊ deull ũa alua q̇ trouxe de paraẏſo con que diſſeſſe miſſa.
      This one is (about) how Holy Mary appeared to Saint Ildefonso in Toledo and gave him an alb from paradise to celebrate mass.

Descendants[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia pt

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese missa, from Late Latin missa (mass), from Latin mittō (I send), from Proto-Indo-European *meyth₂-, *mith₂- (to exchange, remove).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

missa f (plural missas)

  1. mass (religion: celebration of the Eucharist)

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

missa (present missar, preterite missade, supine missat , imperative missa )

  1. to miss; to fail to hit (a target)
  2. to miss; to be late for something;
  3. to miss; to forget about (something which happened or should be done)
  4. to miss; to fail to attend
  5. to miss; to fail to understand or have a shortcoming of perception
  6. to overlook; to look over and beyond (anything) without seeing it

Conjugation[edit]