morte

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Esperanto[edit]

Adverb[edit]

morte

  1. deathly, mortally

French[edit]

Adjective[edit]

morte

  1. feminine singular of mort

Anagrams[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin mortem, accusative form of mors.

Noun[edit]

morte f ‎(plural mortes)

  1. death
  2. (figuratively) end, demise

Synonyms[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin mortem, accusative form of mors.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

morte f ‎(plural morti)

  1. death

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Noun[edit]

morte

  1. ablative singular form of mors

References[edit]

  • morte” in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to be cut off by sudden death: subita morte exstingui
    • to die a natural death: necessaria (opp. voluntaria) morte mori
    • to punish any one with death: morte multare aliquem (Catil. 1. 11. 28)

Neapolitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin mors

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

morte f (please add the plural)

  1. death

Norman[edit]

Adjective[edit]

morte

  1. feminine singular of mort

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese morte, from Latin mortem, singular accusative of mors ‎(death), from Proto-Indo-European *mr̥-, *mr̥-to- ‎(death).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

morte f (plural mortes)

  1. death (cessation of life)
  2. (uncountable) the state of being dead
  3. (figuratively) destruction; ruin
  4. death (personification of death as a hooded figure with a scythe)

Quotations[edit]

For usage examples of this term, see Citations:morte.

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]