morto

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: môrto

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Clipping of mortified +‎ -o

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Adjective[edit]

morto (comparative more morto, superlative most morto)

  1. (Ireland, slang) Very embarrassed or embarrassing.
    • 2007 March 21, Kilian Doyle, "An iconic parade" The Irish Times (Dublin) Motoring p.3
      I was, to use the vernacular, bleedin' morto. My shame notwithstanding, the whole day was a blast.
    • 2013 February 21, Louise McSharry, "Robbie Williams’ most morto moments of all time" Daily Edge:
      Robbie’s had some pretty embarrassing moments over the years. What better time than now to take a stroll down memory lane? Here are his most morto moments.
    • 2013 May 20 "Early trouble" The Irish Times (Dublin) Sport p.2
      Yes, Dan left the game early because he "wanted to miss the traffic and get a kebab on the way home" - after which Coventry scored twice. Morto.

Anagrams[edit]


Esperanto[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French mort, Italian morte, Spanish muerte, Portuguese morte, Romanian moarte, from Latin mors, mortis. All derived from Proto-Indo-European *mr̥-to-. Similar forms also exist in other Indo-European languages, such as Lithuanian mirtis, Russian смерть (smertʹ), Persian مرگ(marg) and Hindi मृत्यु (mŕtyu).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

morto (accusative singular morton, plural mortoj, accusative plural mortojn)

  1. death
    Antonym: vivo

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Galician[edit]

A os mortos na Guerra Civil - To the Civil War dead

Etymology[edit]

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese morto, from Vulgar Latin *mortu(s), from Latin mortuum, perfect active participle of morior (I die). Corresponds to Proto-Indo-European *mr̥twós, *mr̥tós (dead, mortal), *mr̥tó-, ultimately from *mer- (to die). Cognate with Portuguese morto and Spanish muerto.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈmɔɾtʊ], (western) [ˈmoɾtʊ]

Adjective[edit]

morto m (feminine singular morta, masculine plural mortos, feminine plural mortas)

  1. dead; deceased
    Synonym: defunto
  2. (figuratively) extenuated

Noun[edit]

morto m (plural mortos)

  1. corpse
  2. dead person
    Synonym: defunto
  3. (nautical) kind of anchor

Verb[edit]

morto m (feminine singular morta, masculine plural mortos, feminine plural mortas)

  1. irregular masculine singular past participle of morrer

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • morto” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • morto” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • morto” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • morto” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • morto” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Ido[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Esperanto mortoEnglish mortalFrench mortGerman MortalitätItalian morteSpanish muerte.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

morto (plural morti)

  1. death, decease

Derived terms[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *mortus, from Classical Latin mortuus, from Proto-Italic *mortwos, from Proto-Indo-European *mr̥twós, derived from the root *mer- (to die; to disappear).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈmɔr.to/
  • Hyphenation: mòr‧to

Adjective[edit]

morto (feminine singular morta, masculine plural morti, feminine plural morte)

  1. (literally and figuratively) dead
    Synonyms: crepato (colloquial), deceduto, defunto, estinto, perito, scomparso (euphemistic)
    Antonyms: vivente, vivo
    • 1321, Dante Alighieri, La divina commedia: Inferno [The Divine Comedy: Hell] (paperback), 12th edition, Le Monnier, published 1994, Canto V, lines 139–142, page 83–84:
      Mentre che l’uno spirto questo disse, ¶ l’altro piangëa; sì che di pietade ¶ io venni men così com’ io morisse. ¶ E caddi come corpo morto cade.
      And all the while one spirit uttered this, the other one did weep so, that, for pity, I swooned away as if I had been dying, and fell, even as a dead body falls.
    • 1807, Ugo Foscolo, Dei Sepolcri[1], Molini, Landi e comp., published 1809, page 12:
      le madri ¶ Balzan ne’ sonni esterrefatte, e tendono ¶ Nude le braccia su l’amato capo ¶ Del caro lor lattante onde nol desti, ¶ Il gemer lungo di persona morta ¶ Chiedente la venal prece agli eredi ¶ Del santuario
      Mothers are shaken in their sleeps, shocked, and stretch their bare arms on their cherished baby’s beloved head, so that he's not awoken by the long wailing of a dead person asking the shrine’s heirs for the venal prayer
  2. (by extension, colloquial, of a body part) dead (experiencing pins and needles)
  3. (figuratively, of a time period) past
    Synonyms: passato, trascorso
    • 1835, Giacomo Leopardi, “XII. L'infinito [The Infinite]”, in Canti[2], Bari: Einaudi, published 1917, lines 4-8, page 49:
      e mi sovvien l’eterno, ¶ e le morte stagioni, e la presente ¶ e viva, e il suon di lei.
      and I remember the eternal and the dead seasons, and the living present, and its sound

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

morto m (plural morti, feminine morta)

  1. dead man
    Synonym: defunto
  2. corpse, dead body
    Synonyms: cadavere, corpo
  3. (figuratively) An inactive or idle person.
  4. (card games) A fourth, absent player.
    1. (bridge) dummy

Participle[edit]

morto m (feminine singular morta, masculine plural morti, feminine plural morte)

  1. past participle of morire; died.

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • morto in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Portuguese[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese morto, from Vulgar Latin *mortu(s), from Latin mortuum, perfect active participle of morior (I die). Corresponds to Proto-Indo-European *mr̥twós, *mr̥tós (dead, mortal), *mr̥tó-, ultimately from *mer- (to die).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

morto m (feminine singular morta, masculine plural mortos, feminine plural mortas, sometimes comparable)

  1. dead (no longer living)
    Synonym: falecido
    Antonym: vivo
  2. dead (completely inactive)
  3. (informal) exhausted (extremely tired)
    Synonyms: moído, exausto, exaurido
  4. (figuratively) dead (not showing emotion)
    Synonyms: frio, gélido

Inflection[edit]

Usage notes[edit]

Used with estar instead of ser.

Quotations[edit]

For quotations of use of this term, see Citations:morto.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

morto m (plural mortos, feminine morta, feminine plural mortas)

  1. a dead person; someone who has died
    Synonyms: defunto, finado
    Antonym: vivo
  2. corpse (the body of a dead person)
    Synonyms: corpo, cadáver, defunto
  3. (card games) a number of cards set apart that can be picked up by the first player to play all his cards

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

morto (feminine singular morta, masculine plural mortos, feminine plural mortas)

  1. masculine singular short past participle of matar