morto

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: môrto

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Clipping of mortified +‎ -o

Adjective[edit]

morto (comparative more morto, superlative most morto)

  1. (Ireland, slang) Very embarrassed or embarrassing.
    • 2007 March 21, Kilian Doyle, "An iconic parade" The Irish Times (Dublin) Motoring p.3
      I was, to use the vernacular, bleedin' morto. My shame notwithstanding, the whole day was a blast.
    • 2013 February 21, Louise McSharry, "Robbie Williams’ most morto moments of all time" Daily Edge:
      Robbie’s had some pretty embarrassing moments over the years. What better time than now to take a stroll down memory lane? Here are his most morto moments.
    • 2013 May 20 "Early trouble" The Irish Times (Dublin) Sport p.2
      Yes, Dan left the game early because he "wanted to miss the traffic and get a kebab on the way home" - after which Coventry scored twice. Morto.

Anagrams[edit]


Esperanto[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French mort, Italian morte, Spanish muerte, Portuguese morte, Romanian moarte, from Latin mors, mortis. All derived from Proto-Indo-European *mr̥-to-. Similar forms also exist in other Indo-European languages, such as Lithuanian mirtis, Russian смерть (smert), Persian مرگ(marg) and Hindi मृत्यु (mṛtyú).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈmor.to/
  • Hyphenation: mor‧to

Noun[edit]

morto (accusative singular morton, plural mortoj, accusative plural mortojn)

  1. death
    Antonym: vivo

Related terms[edit]


Ido[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Esperanto mortoEnglish mortalFrench mortGerman MortalitätItalian morteSpanish muerte.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

morto (plural morti)

  1. death, decease

Derived terms[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *mortus, from Classical Latin mortuus, from Proto-Italic *mortwos, from Proto-Indo-European *mr̥twós, derived from the root *mer- (to die; to disappear).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈmɔr.to/
  • Stress: mòrto
  • Hyphenation: mor‧to

Adjective[edit]

morto (feminine singular morta, masculine plural morti, feminine plural morte)

  1. (literally and figuratively) dead
    Synonyms: crepato (colloquial), deceduto, defunto, estinto, perito, scomparso (euphemistic)
    Antonyms: vivente, vivo
    • 1321, Dante Alighieri, La divina commedia: Inferno [The Divine Comedy: Hell] (paperback, in Italian), 12th edition, Le Monnier, published 1994, Canto V, lines 139–142, page 83–84:
      Mentre che l’uno spirto questo disse, ¶ l’altro piangëa; sì che di pietade ¶ io venni men così com’ io morisse. ¶ E caddi come corpo morto cade.
      And all the while one spirit uttered this, the other one did weep so, that, for pity, I swooned away as if I had been dying, and fell, even as a dead body falls.
    • 1807, Ugo Foscolo, Dei Sepolcri[1] (in Italian), Molini, Landi e comp., published 1809, page 12:
      le madri ¶ Balzan ne’ sonni esterrefatte, e tendono ¶ Nude le braccia su l’amato capo ¶ Del caro lor lattante onde nol desti, ¶ Il gemer lungo di persona morta ¶ Chiedente la venal prece agli eredi ¶ Del santuario
      Mothers are shaken in their sleeps, shocked, and stretch their bare arms on their cherished baby’s beloved head, so that he's not awoken by the long wailing of a dead person asking the shrine’s heirs for the venal prayer
  2. (by extension, colloquial, of a body part) dead (experiencing pins and needles)
  3. (figuratively, of a time period) past
    Synonyms: passato, trascorso
    • 1835, Giacomo Leopardi, “XII. L'infinito [The Infinite]”, in Canti[2] (in Italian), Bari: Einaudi, published 1917, lines 4-8, page 49:
      e mi sovvien l’eterno, ¶ e le morte stagioni, e la presente ¶ e viva, e il suon di lei.
      and I remember the eternal and the dead seasons, and the living present, and its sound

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

morto m (plural morti, feminine morta)

  1. dead man
    Synonym: defunto
  2. corpse, dead body
    Synonyms: cadavere, corpo
  3. (figuratively) An inactive or idle person.
  4. (card games) A fourth, absent player.
    1. (bridge) dummy

Participle[edit]

morto m (feminine singular morta, masculine plural morti, feminine plural morte)

  1. past participle of morire; died.

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • morto in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Portuguese[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese morto, from Vulgar Latin *mortu(s), from Latin mortuum, perfect active participle of morior (I die). Corresponds to Proto-Indo-European *mr̥twós, *mr̥tós (dead, mortal), *mr̥tó-, ultimately from *mer- (to die).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

morto m (feminine singular morta, masculine plural mortos, feminine plural mortas, sometimes comparable)

  1. dead (no longer living)
  2. dead (completely inactive)
  3. (informal) exhausted (extremely tired)
  4. (figuratively) dead (not showing emotion)

Inflection[edit]

Usage notes[edit]

Used with estar instead of ser.

Quotations[edit]

For quotations of use of this term, see Citations:morto.

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

  • (no longer living): vivo

Related terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

morto m (plural mortos, feminine morta, feminine plural mortas)

  1. corpse (dead person)
  2. (card games) a number of cards set apart that can be picked up by the first player to play all his cards

Synonyms[edit]

Synonyms[edit]