overthrow

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From over- +‎ throw.

Verb[edit]

overthrow (third-person singular simple present overthrows, present participle overthrowing, simple past overthrew, past participle overthrown)

  1. (transitive, now rare) To throw down to the ground, to overturn.
    • 1526, William Tyndale, trans. Bible, John II:
      And he made a scourge of smale cordes, and drave them all out off the temple, bothe shepe and oxen, and powred doune the changers money, and overthrue their tables.
    • Jeremy Taylor
      His wife overthrew the table.
  2. (transitive) To bring about the downfall of (a government, etc.), especially by force.
    I hate the current government, but not enough to want to overthrow them.
    • Dryden
      When the walls of Thebes he overthrew.
    • Shakespeare
      [Gloucester] that seeks to overthrow religion.
Translations[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

overthrow (plural overthrows)

  1. A removal, especially of a ruler or government, by force or threat of force.
    • 1945, George Orwell, Animal Farm, chapter 1
      What then must we do? Why, work night and day, body and soul, for the overthrow of the human race!
Hypernyms[edit]
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Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

over- +‎ throw

Verb[edit]

overthrow (third-person singular simple present overthrows, present participle overthrowing, simple past overthrew, past participle overthrown)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To throw (something) so that it goes too far.

Noun[edit]

overthrow (plural overthrows)

  1. (sports) A throw that goes too far.
    He overthrew first base, for an error.
  2. (cricket) A run scored by the batting side when a fielder throws the ball back to the infield, whence it continues to the opposite outfield.

Quotations[edit]