sud

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Sud, SUD, súd, süd, Süd, suð, sud-, súð, and suď

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From a variation of sod, itself a shortening of sodden. Related to seethe.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sud (plural suds)

  1. (informal) A bubble of lather or foam (the singular of suds).
    • 2018, Derek B. Miller, American By Day, page 114:
      There is a beer sud parked on her upper lip.

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Aromanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French sud. Compare Romanian sud.

Noun[edit]

sud

  1. south

See also[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French sud, from Old English suþ, from Proto-Germanic *sunþrą.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sud m (uncountable)

  1. south
    al sud de Londres
    south of London

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

See also[edit]

(compass points) punt cardinal;

nord-oest
(n-occ)
nord
(sept)
nord-est
(n-or)
oest
(occ)
Compass rose simple plain.svg est
(or)
sud-oest
(s-occ)
sud
(mer)
sud-est
(s-or)

Further reading[edit]


Corsican[edit]

U sud.

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French sud. Cognates include Italian sud and Spanish sur.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈsud/
  • Hyphenation: sud

Noun[edit]

sud m (uncountable)

  1. south

References[edit]

  • sud, sudu” in INFCOR: Banca di dati di a lingua corsa

Czech[edit]

Czech Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia cs

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sud m inan

  1. barrel
  2. keg party

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • sud in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • sud in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French sud, from Old French su, sud (south), from Old English sūþ (south), from Proto-Germanic *sunþrą. More at south.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sud m (plural sud)

  1. south

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French sud, from Old English suþ, from Proto-Germanic *sunþrą.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sud m (invariable)

  1. south
    Synonyms: meridione, mezzogiorno
    Antonym: nord

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Norman[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • su (continental Normandy)

Etymology[edit]

From Old French sud, su (south), from Old English sūþ, from Proto-Germanic *sunþrą.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Noun[edit]

sud m (invariable)

  1. (Jersey, Guernsey) south

Occitan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sud m (uncountable)

  1. south
    Antonym: nòrd

Further reading[edit]

  • Joan de Cantalausa (2006) Diccionari general occitan a partir dels parlars lengadocians, 2 edition, →ISBN, page 935.

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French sud, from Old English suþ, from Proto-Germanic *sunþrą.

Noun[edit]

sud n (uncountable)

  1. south

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Coordinate terms[edit]

nord-vest nord
(miazănoapte)
nord-est
vest
(apus)
Compass rose simple plain.svg est
(răsărit)
sud-vest sud
(miazăzi)
sud-est

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Serbo-Croatian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sh

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *sǫdъ.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sȗd m (Cyrillic spelling су̑д)

  1. court
  2. courthouse
  3. tribunal
  4. judgment
Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *sǫdъ.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sȗd m (Cyrillic spelling су̑д)

  1. (regional) vessel
  2. (regional) dish
Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  • sud” in Hrvatski jezični portal
  • sud” in Hrvatski jezični portal

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French sud.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sud m (uncountable)

  1. (Latin America) south
    Synonym: (more common) sur

Further reading[edit]


Uzbek[edit]

Uzbek Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia uz

Etymology[edit]

From Russian суд (sud).

Noun[edit]

sud (plural sudlar)

  1. court

Westrobothnian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse súð.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sud f

  1. (nautical, of a boat) A ship's side; boat edge, top part, edge around a boat, responding to railing on larger craft.

Derived terms[edit]