bale

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See also: Bale and Bâle

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /beɪ̯l/, [ˈbeɪ̯(ə)ɫ], [beə̯ɫ]
  • Rhymes: -eɪl
  • Homophone: bail

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English bealo, from Proto-Germanic *balwô. Cognate with Gothic 𐌱𐌰𐌻𐍅𐌴𐌹𐌽𐍃 (balweins, torture), Old High German balo (destruction), Old Norse bǫl (disaster).

Noun[edit]

bale (uncountable)

  1. Evil, especially considered as an active force for destruction or death.
  2. Suffering, woe, torment.
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, VI.7:
      That other swayne, like ashes deadly pale, / Lay in the lap of death, rewing his wretched bale.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Form Old English bǣl, from Proto-Germanic *bēlō, from Proto-Indo-European. Cognate with Old Norse bál (which may have been the direct source for the English word).

Noun[edit]

bale (plural bales)

  1. (obsolete) A large fire, a conflagration or bonfire.
  2. (archaic) A funeral pyre.
  3. (archaic) A beacon-fire.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Precise derivation uncertain: perhaps from Old French bale, balle, from Medieval Latin balla (ball, rounded package), from Germanic; or perhaps from Dutch baal, itself borrowed from French.

Noun[edit]

bale (plural bales)

  1. A rounded bundle or package of goods in a cloth cover, and corded for storage or transportation.
  2. A bundle of compressed wool or hay, compacted for shipping and handling.
  3. A measurement of hay equal to 10 flakes. Approximately 70-90 lbs (32-41 kg).
  4. A measurement of paper equal to 10 reams.
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Verb[edit]

bale (third-person singular simple present bales, present participle baling, simple past and past participle baled)

  1. (transitive) To wrap into a bale.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

Alternative spelling of bail

Verb[edit]

bale (third-person singular simple present bales, present participle baling, simple past and past participle baled)

  1. (UK, nautical) To remove water from a boat with buckets etc.
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Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

bale

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of balen

Anagrams[edit]


Javanese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *balay, from Proto-Austronesian *balay.

Noun[edit]

bale

  1. pavilion

Kapampangan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Philippine *balay, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *balay, from Proto-Austronesian *balay.

Noun[edit]

bale

  1. house

Portuguese[edit]

Verb[edit]

bale

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of balar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of balar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of balar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of balar

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin root *baba. Compare French bave, Italian bava, Spanish and Portuguese baba. The normal result, *ba, is not used as the singular has been replaced with bală through analogy.

Noun[edit]

bale f (plural)

  1. slobber, drool, dribble, saliva

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Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

bale

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of balar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of balar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of balar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of balar.

Turkish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from French ballet.

Noun[edit]

bale (definite accusative baleyi, plural baleler)

  1. ballet