horror

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See also: Horror

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • horrour (UK, hypercorrect spelling or archaic)

Etymology[edit]

From Old French horror, from Latin horror (a bristling, a shaking, trembling as with cold or fear, terror), from horrere (to bristle, shake, be terrified).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

horror (plural horrors)

  1. An intense painful emotion of fear or repugnance.
  2. An intense dislike or aversion; an abhorrence.
  3. A genre of fiction, meant to evoke a feeling of fear and suspense.
    • 1898 July 3, Philadelphia Inquirer, page 22:
      The Home Magazine for July (Binghamton and New York) contains ‘The Patriots' War Chant,’ a poem by Douglas Malloch; ‘The Story of the War,’ by Theodore Waters; ‘A Horseman in the Sky,’ by Ambrose Bierce, with a portrait of Mr. Bierce, whose tales of horror are horrible of themselves, not as war is horrible; ‘A Yankee Hero,’ by W. L. Calver; ‘The Warfare of the Future,’ by Louis Seemuller; ‘Florence Nightingale,’ by Susan E. Dickenson, with two rare portraits, etc.
    • 1917 February 11, New York Times, page 52:
      Those who enjoy horror, stories overflowing with blood and black mystery, will be grateful to Richard Marsh for writing ‘The Beetle.’
    • 1947, Dracula (1931) re-release poster, tagline:
      A Nightmare of Horror!
  4. (informal) An intense anxiety or a nervous depression; this sense can also be spoken or written as the horrors.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

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Translations[edit]

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External links[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From horreo +‎ -or.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

horror m (genitive horrōris); third declension

  1. bristling (standing on end)
  2. shaking, shivering, chill
  3. dread, terror, horror

Inflection[edit]

Third declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative horror horrōrēs
genitive horrōris horrōrum
dative horrōrī horrōribus
accusative horrōrem horrōrēs
ablative horrōre horrōribus
vocative horror horrōrēs

Descendants[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin horror, horroris.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

horror m (plural horrores)

  1. horror

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Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin horror, horroris

Noun[edit]

horror m (plural horrores)

  1. horror

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]