polis

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English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Ancient Greek πόλις (pólis, city state).

Noun[edit]

polis (plural poleis or polises)

  1. A city, or a city-state.
    • 2006, Karen Armstrong, The Great Transformation, Atlantic Books 2007, p. 161:
      By the end of the century, poleis had been established throughout the Hellenic world, all bearing a marked family resemblance.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Standard English police, compare Scots polis.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

polis (countable and uncountable, plural polises)

  1. (uncountable, Geordie) The police.
  2. (countable, Geordie) A policeman or policewoman.
References[edit]
  • A Dictionary of North East Dialect, Bill Griffiths, 2005, Northumbria University Press, ISBN 1904794165

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Italian polizza, from Latin apodixa, from Ancient Greek, from ἀπόδειξις (apódeiksis, proof), from ἀποδείκνυμι (apodeíknumi, I prove).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

polis c (plural polissen, diminutive polisje n)

  1. insurance policy

French[edit]

Verb[edit]

polis

  1. first-person singular present indicative of polir
  2. second-person singular present indicative of polir
  3. first-person singular past historic of polir
  4. second-person singular past historic of polir
  5. second-person singular imperative of polir
  6. masculine plural past participle of polir

Adjective[edit]

polis

  1. masculine plural form of poli

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Noun[edit]

polīs

  1. dative plural of polus
  2. ablative plural of polus

Latvian[edit]

Latvian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia lv

Etymology[edit]

Ultimately from Polish polak, Russian поляк (polják) (under the influence of Old High German pōlcf. German, English Pole — and perhaps also of Latvian dialectal bolis, polis (ox without horns)), itself derived from Polish pole (field), perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *pel- (light (color), gray).[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

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Noun[edit]

polis m (2nd declension, feminine form: poliete)

  1. a Pole, a Polish man, a man born in Poland
    pēc Livonijas kara poļi ieguva Vidzemi un Latgali — after the Livonian War the Poles obtained Vidzeme and Latgale
  2. (genitive plural) Polish; pertaining to Poland and its people
    poļu valoda — the Polish language
    poļu mākslaPolish art

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ “polis” in Konstantīns Karulis (1992, 2001), Latviešu Etimoloģijas Vārdnīca, in 2 vols, Rīga: AVOTS, ISBN: 9984-700-12-7

Papiamentu[edit]

Noun[edit]

polis

  1. police

Scots[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From the French police.

Noun[edit]

polis (countable and uncountable; plural polises)

  1. (uncountable) police
    • 1987, Robbie Kydd, ...Auld Zimmery, Mariscat Press 1987:
      'Listen then. Yer name's Andy MacPhail. That's whit us three has jist tellt the polis in wir statements. Okay?'
    • 1991, Dr James Begg, Dipper: 20 – Cops and Robbers, Luath Press 1991:
      ‘Aye, Andra,' cam back the reply. 'We micht as weel caa it a day doun here. The hale bluidy place is hotchin wi polis! Come doun an get us at the Auld Raw.'
    • 2007, Sheena Blackhall, The Quarry, Lochlands 2007:
      Brian hid contactit his granfaither, Pat, tae see gin the polis computers could raik up onythin ava tae makk eese o in persuadin Bappy Anderson tae pairt wi a kidney.
    • 2013, Donal McLaughlin, translating Pedro Lenz, Naw Much of a Talker, Freight Books 2013, p. 51:
      Coont yirsel lucky ahm naw cawin the polis. Noo fuck off.

Etymology 2[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Adjective[edit]

polis

  1. Polish

Verb[edit]

polis

  1. polish
  2. adorn, beautify

References[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia es

Etymology 1[edit]

From Ancient Greek πόλις (pólis, city-state).

Noun[edit]

polis f (plural polis)

  1. polis

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

polis m pl, f pl

  1. plural form of poli

Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

polis c

  1. police (as an organization or as an individual)

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]


Tok Pisin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English police.

Noun[edit]

polis

  1. police

Turkish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French police.

Noun[edit]

polis

  1. police (an organisation that enforces the law)
  2. police (member of the police force)

Usage notes[edit]

Synonyms[edit]