adjunct

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English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Latin adiunctus, perfect passive participle of adiungō (join to), from ad + iungō (join). Doublet of adjoint.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈædʒ.ʌŋkt/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: ad‧junct

Noun[edit]

adjunct (plural adjuncts)

  1. An appendage; something attached to something else in a subordinate capacity.
  2. A person associated with another, usually in a subordinate position; a colleague.
    • 1641, Henry Wotton, A Parallel between Robert late Earl of Essex and George late Duke of Buckingham
      Lord Cottington (as an adjunct of singular experience and trust)
  3. (brewing) An unmalted grain or grain product that supplements the main mash ingredient.
  4. (dated, metaphysics) A quality or property of the body or mind, whether natural or acquired, such as colour in the body or judgement in the mind.
  5. (music) A key or scale closely related to another as principal; a relative or attendant key.
  6. (grammar) A dispensable phrase in a clause or sentence that amplifies its meaning, such as "for a while" in "I typed for a while".
  7. (syntax, X-bar theory) A constituent which is both the daughter and the sister of an X-bar.
    • 1988, Andrew Radford, Transformational grammar: a first course, Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, page 177:
      We can see from (34) that Determiners are sisters of N-bar and daughters of
      N-double-bar; Adjuncts are both sisters and daughters of N-bar; and Comple-
      ments are sisters of N and daughters of N-bar. This means that Adjuncts re-
      semble Complements in that both are daughters of N-bar; but they differ from
      Complements in that Adjuncts are sisters of N-bar, whereas Complements are
      sisters of N. Likewise, it means that Adjuncts resemble Determiners in that
      both are sisters of N-bar, but they differ from Determiners in that Adjuncts
      are daughters of N-bar, whereas Determiners are daughters of N-double-bar.
  8. (rhetoric) Symploce.
  9. (category theory) One of a pair of morphisms which relate to each other through a pair of adjoint functors.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

adjunct (comparative more adjunct, superlative most adjunct)

  1. Connected in a subordinate function.
  2. Added to a faculty or staff in a secondary position.

Translations[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch adjoinct, from Latin adiunctus.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɑˈdjʏŋkt/, /ɑtˈjʏŋkt/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: ad‧junct
  • Rhymes: -ʏŋkt

Noun[edit]

adjunct m (plural adjuncten)

  1. An adjunct, a subordinate person, esp. an attendant of a government official.

Related terms[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From German Adjunkt or Latin adjunctus

Adjective[edit]

adjunct m or n (feminine singular adjunctă, masculine plural adjuncți, feminine and neuter plural adjuncte)

  1. deputy

Declension[edit]