brach

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See also: Brach

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Originally in plural, from Old French brachez, plural of brachet, a diminutive of Occitan brac, from Frankish. Cognate to the German Bracke. More at brachet.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /bɹæt͡ʃ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ætʃ

Noun[edit]

brach (plural brachs or braches)

  1. (archaic) A hound; especially a female hound used for hunting, a bitch hound.
    • ca. 1604-1606, William Shakespeare, King Lear, 1, 4, 109-111.
      FOOL: Truth's a dog that must to kennel; he must be whipped out, when Lady, the brach, may stand by the fire and stink.
    • 1605, William Shakespeare, King Lear, First Folio (1623), III.6:
      Mastiffe, Grey-hound, Mongrill, Grim, / Hound or Spaniell, Brache, or Hym […].
    • 1624, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], The Anatomy of Melancholy: [], 2nd edition, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, OCLC 54573970:
      , NYRB 2001, vol.1 p.331:
      A sow-pig by chance sucked a brach, and when she was grown, “would miraculously hunt all manner of deer, and that as well, or rather better than any ordinary hound.”
  2. (archaic, derogatory) A despicable or disagreeable woman.
    • 1847, Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights, chapter XVI:
      Now, was it not the depth of absurdity—of genuine idiotcy, for that pitiful, slavish, mean-minded brach to dream that I could love her?
Synonyms[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Shortening of brachiopod.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

brach (plural brachs)

  1. (paleontology, informal) brachiopod

Anagrams[edit]


Czech[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From bratr (brother) +‎ -ch.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈbrax]
  • Hyphenation: brach

Noun[edit]

brach m anim

  1. (colloquial) bro
  2. (colloquial) guy

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • brach in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • brach in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Backformation from brachliegen, from in Brache liegen, from the noun Brache (fallow land, fallowness). Cognate with Dutch braak. Related with brechen (etymology 2).

Adjective[edit]

brach (not comparable)

  1. fallow
    Synonyms: unbestellt, unbebaut
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

brach

  1. first/third-person singular preterite of brechen

Irish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

brach m (genitive singular bracha)

  1. pus
  2. discharge from eyes during sleep
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

brach f (genitive singular braiche)

  1. Alternative form of braich (malt)
Declension[edit]

Verb[edit]

brach (present analytic brachann, future analytic brachfaidh, verbal noun brachadh, past participle brachta)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) Alternative form of braich (malt)
Conjugation[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
brach bhrach mbrach
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]


Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /brax/
  • Rhymes: -ax
  • Syllabification: brach

Etymology 1[edit]

From brat (brother) +‎ -ch.

Noun[edit]

brach m pers

  1. (colloquial) a male comrade or friend; bro
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun[edit]

brach m

  1. locative plural of ber
    Synonym: berach

Further reading[edit]

  • brach in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • brach in Polish dictionaries at PWN