brat

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See also: Brat, BRAT, brát, brãt, braț, and bråţ

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Origin uncertain. According to the Online Etymology Dictionary, the term "brat" derives from an Old English slang term meaning "beggar's child". Originally a dialectal word, from northern and western England and the Midlands, for a "makeshift or ragged garment"; probably the same word as Old English bratt ‎(cloak), which is from a Celtic source (compare Old Irish bratt ‎(cloak, cloth)).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

brat ‎(plural brats)

  1. (pejorative slang) A child; especially, one who is regarded as mischievous, unruly, spoiled, or selfish.
    Get that little brat away from me!
  2. (slang) A son or daughter (at any age) of an active military service member.
    an army brat
  3. a turbot or flatfish
  4. (obsolete) A rough cloak or ragged garment
    • 1386, Geoffrey Chaucer, “Line 881”, in The Canon's Yeoman's Tale[1]:
      Whicħ þat þey myght / wrape hem in at nyght / And a brat / to walk in / by day-light
  5. (obsolete, Britain, Scotland, dialect) A coarse kind of apron for keeping the clothes clean; a bib.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Wright to this entry?)
  6. (obsolete) The young of an animal.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of L'Estrange to this entry?)
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Shortened from bratwurst, from the German Bratwurst

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

brat ‎(plural brats)

  1. (informal) bratwurst
Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

brat ‎(plural brats)

  1. (mining) A thin bed of coal mixed with pyrites or carbonate of lime.

Etymology 4[edit]

Noun[edit]

brat

  1. (military) Acronym of Born, Raised, And Transferred.

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /brat/, [b̥ʁɑd̥]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse brantr, brattr. Cognate with Faroese and Icelandic brattur, Norwegian bratt, Swedish brant, and Old English brant, bront (English brant, brent, Scots brent).

Alternative forms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

brat

  1. steep
Inflection[edit]
Inflection of brat
Positive Comparative Superlative
Common singular brat brattere brattest
Neuter singular brat brattere brattest
Plural bratte brattere brattest
Definite bratte brattere bratteste

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse brattr ‎(steep) and merged with Old Norse bráðr ‎(hasty, sudden), from Proto-Germanic *brēþaz ‎(hot, in a hurry, rushed), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰrē-, *bʰerē- ‎(steam, vapour), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰer- ‎(to seethe, toss about, cook).

Adjective[edit]

brat

  1. sudden
Inflection[edit]
Inflection of brat
Positive Comparative Superlative
Common singular brat brattere brattest
Neuter singular brat brattere brattest
Plural bratte brattere brattest
Definite bratte brattere bratteste

References[edit]


German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

brat

  1. Imperative singular of braten.
  2. (colloquial) First-person singular present of braten.

Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Irish bratt, from Proto-Celtic *bratto- (compare Welsh brethyn ‎(cloth), from *bratt-ino-).

Noun[edit]

brat m ‎(genitive singular brait, nominative plural brait)

  1. mantle, cloak
  2. covering
  3. (theater) curtain
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology Scriptorium.

Noun[edit]

brat m ‎(genitive singular brat, nominative plural bratanna)

  1. broth; thick soup
Declension[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
brat bhrat mbrat
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  • "brat" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • bratt” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

Kashubian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *bratrъ, *bratъ, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰréh₂tēr.

Noun[edit]

brat m

  1. brother

Lower Sorbian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

brat

  1. supine of braś

Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *bratrъ, *bratъ, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰréh₂tēr.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

brat m pers ‎(diminutive braciszek)

  1. brother
    • Uwspółcześniona Biblia Gdańska, Mark 1:16:
      A przechadzając się nad Morzem Galilejskim, zobaczył Szymona i Andrzeja, jego brata, zarzucających sieć w morze; byli bowiem rybakami.
      As Jesus was strolling beside the Sea of Galilee, he saw Simon and Andrew, his brother, casting a net into the sea; they were fishermen

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

External links[edit]

  • brat in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish bratt, from Proto-Celtic *bratto- (compare Welsh brethyn ‎(cloth), from *bratt-ino-).

Noun[edit]

brat m ‎(genitive singular brata, plural bratan)

  1. cloak, cover, covering, mantle, veil, canopy
  2. mat

Derived terms[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *bratrъ, *bratъ, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰréh₂tēr.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

brȁt m ‎(Cyrillic spelling бра̏т)

  1. brother
  2. mate, pal, buddy, when used in informal speech to address somebody in vocative (brate)

Declension[edit]

Usage notes[edit]

There is no plural form for this noun. Instead, the collective term brȁća is used for plural meanings.

Derived terms[edit]


Slovak[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *bratrъ, *bratъ, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰréh₂tēr.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

brat m ‎(genitive singular brata, nominative plural bratia, declension pattern of chlap)

  1. brother

Declension[edit]

External links[edit]

  • brat in Slovak dictionaries at korpus.sk

Slovene[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *bratrъ, *bratъ, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰréh₂tēr.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bràt m anim ‎(genitive bráta, nominative plural brátje or bráti)

  1. brother

Declension[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from English brat ‎(spoiled child).

Noun[edit]

brat c

  1. (slang) person who is very careful about following fashion trends; someone who rarely ever acts independently but rather follows peer pressure, usually maintaining an appearance of visible wealth

Usage notes[edit]

  • Mainly used in plural, as a collective noun.
  • Can occasionally be seen considered as neuter rather than common.

Synonyms[edit]