coy

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See also: Coy and cố ý

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English coy, from Old French coi, earlier quei (quiet, still), from Latin quietus (resting, at rest). Doublet of quiet.

Adjective[edit]

coy (comparative coyer, superlative coyest)

  1. (dated) Bashful, shy, retiring.
  2. (archaic) Quiet, reserved, modest.
  3. Reluctant to give details about something sensitive; notably prudish.
  4. Pretending shyness or modesty, especially in an insincere or flirtatious way.
    • 1981, A. D. Hope, "His Coy Mistress to Mr. Marvell," A Book of Answers:
      The ill-bred miss, the bird-brained Jill, / May simper and be coy at will; / A lady, sir, as you will find, / Keeps counsel, or she speaks her mind, / Means what she says and scorns to fence / And palter with feigned innocence.
  5. Soft, gentle, hesitating.
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb[edit]

coy (third-person singular simple present coys, present participle coying, simple past and past participle coyed)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To caress, pet; to coax, entice.
  2. (transitive, obsolete) To calm or soothe.
  3. (transitive, obsolete) To allure; to decoy.
    • 1635, Edward Rainbowe, Labour Forbidden, and Commanded. A Sermon Preached at St. Pauls[sic] Church, September 28. 1634., London: Nicholas Vavasour, page 29:
      For now there are ſprung up a wiſer generation in this kind, who have the Art to coy the fonder ſort into their nets

Etymology 2[edit]

Compare decoy.

Noun[edit]

coy (plural coys)

  1. A trap from which waterfowl may be hunted.

Etymology 3[edit]

Abbreviation of company.

Noun[edit]

coy (plural coys)

  1. (military) A company

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Huave[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

coy

  1. rheumatism

References[edit]

  • Stairs Kreger, Glenn Albert; Scharfe de Stairs, Emily Florence; Olvaries Oviedo, Proceso; Ponce Villanueva, Tereso; Comonfort Llave, Lorenzo (1981) Diccionario huave de San Mateo del Mar (Serie de vocabularios indígenas “Mariano Silva y Aceves”; 24)‎[1] (in Spanish), México, D.F.: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, pages 88, 205, 268

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

coy

  1. rabbit

References[edit]

  • Stairs Kreger, Glenn Albert; Scharfe de Stairs, Emily Florence; Olvaries Oviedo, Proceso; Ponce Villanueva, Tereso; Comonfort Llave, Lorenzo (1981) Diccionario huave de San Mateo del Mar (Serie de vocabularios indígenas “Mariano Silva y Aceves”; 24)‎[2] (in Spanish), México, D.F.: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, pages 88, 212, 416

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

coy

  1. short tail, stub

References[edit]

  • Stairs Kreger, Glenn Albert; Scharfe de Stairs, Emily Florence; Olvaries Oviedo, Proceso; Ponce Villanueva, Tereso; Comonfort Llave, Lorenzo (1981) Diccionario huave de San Mateo del Mar (Serie de vocabularios indígenas “Mariano Silva y Aceves”; 24)‎[3] (in Spanish), México, D.F.: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, pages 88, 211, 265

Middle French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French coi, from Vulgar Latin quetus, from Latin quietus.

Adjective[edit]

coy m (feminine singular coye, masculine plural coys, feminine plural coyes)

  1. (of a person) calm; composed

Descendants[edit]

  • French: coi

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch kooi (bunk). Doublet of gavia and cávea.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

coy m (plural coyes or cois)

  1. (nautical) a type of hammock made of sailcloth used as a makeshift bunk

Wastek[edit]

Noun[edit]

coy

  1. rabbit