duel

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: -dül and dual

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Medieval Latin duellum (fight between two men), under influence from Latin duo, from Old Latin duellum (whence Latin bellum (war)), from Proto-Indo-European *dāu-, *dəu- *dū- (to injure, destroy, burn).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

duel (plural duels)

(Can we add an example for this sense?)

  1. Arranged, regular combat between two private persons, often over a matter of honor.
  2. Historically, the wager of battle (judicial combat)
  3. Any struggle between two contending persons, groups or ideas.

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb[edit]

duel (third-person singular simple present duels, present participle (US) dueling or (UK) duelling, simple past and past participle (US) dueled or (UK) duelled)

  1. To engage in a battle.
    The two dogs were duelling for the bone.

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

dual

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Medieval Latin duellum (fight between two men), under influence from Latin duo, from Old Latin duellum (whence Latin bellum (war)), from Proto-Indo-European *dāu-, *deu- (to injure, destroy, burn).

Noun[edit]

duel m (plural duels)

  1. duel

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin duellum (war).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /duɛl/, [d̥uˈɛlˀ]

Noun[edit]

duel c (singular definite duellen, plural indefinite dueller)

  1. duel

Inflection[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Middle French duel, from Latin duellum (duel; war), archaic form of bellum (war). In Mediaeval Latin the meaning shifted from “war” to “duel” because of folk etymology associating it with duo (two).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

duel n (plural duels, diminutive duelletje n)

  1. A duel.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


French[edit]

French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin duālis.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

duel (feminine singular duelle, masculine plural duels, feminine plural duelles)

  1. dual (having two components)

Related terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

duel m (plural duels)

  1. duel (battle)
  2. (grammar) dual

Further reading[edit]


Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Probably from Late Latin dolus, from Latin dolor (pain), or from Vulgar Latin *dolium, from Latin cordolium (sorrow of the heart), from dolor.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

duel m (oblique plural dueus or duex or duels, nominative singular dueus or duex or duels, nominative plural duel)

  1. sadness; grief; sorrow

Descendants[edit]

  • French: deuil
  • Norman: deu

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French duel, from Latin duellum.

Noun[edit]

duel n (plural dueluri)

  1. duel

Declension[edit]